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How to: Make Simple, Organic DIY Lip Balm for 25¢

by Rebekah Greiman

DIY Lip Balm recipe

I like to re-invent and create things around my home. And I like to do so inexpensively and with my own little flair. So today, I have a low cost, simple and organic recipe for DIY Lip Balm.  

My hubby and I go through inordinate amount of lip balm. And at $3 a tube, it was beginning to add up. I wanted to find a way that I could circumvent the cost, the unnecessary added chemicals and the need for store-bought lip balm. For approximately $.25 a tube, I had my very own lip balm without the chemicals.     

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How to: Make Inexpensive, DIY All-Natural Pest Deterrents for Your Garden

by Rebekah Greiman

'Tis the season to be gardening. And with it, 'tis the season to be ridding your garden of nasty pests that munch on your prized plants. 

How to: Make Inexpensive, DIY All-Natural Pest Deterrents for Your Garden

I love creating my own DIY deterrents to rid the garden of those pesky pests, without harming my plants, myself, or the environment. These non-toxic recipes are very inexpensive and simple to make at home.   

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Kick the (Cleaner) Bucket: Clean Your Entire Home with Just Two Homemade Cleansers

by Rebekah Greiman

Kick the (Cleaner) Bucket: Clean Your Entire Home with Just Two Homemade Cleansers

I used to lug around a huge bucket full of cleaning products. And rubber gloves. And a bunch of plastic brushes, scrubbers, and a roll of paper towels. All over my house.

Then, I realized I was spending an arm and a leg on store bought cleaning products, and filling my house with chemicals neither my family nor the environment needed. And that bucket was hea - vy.    

created at: 03/08/2013

So, I came up with these two easy-to-remember recipes, using just...

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How to: Make a DIY Upcycled Rag Rug

by Rebekah Greiman

How to: Make a DIY Upcycled Rag Rug

Hi Curbliers! Today, I'm excited to share an easy tutorial on how to make a inexpensive rag rug. This handmade, vintage project can bring some warmth to any room, and will last for a very long time. Plus, they're machine washable, which only adds to their softness. 

Materials and Tools:
  • Old bed sheets (twin size or larger)
  • Scissors
  • Tape Measure
  • Craft Needle (used for sewing through heavy fabrics)
  • Invisible Thread
  • Safety Pin
  • Straight Pins
Due to my frugal nature, I like buy my sheets on sale or from a thrift store. I chose three different colors of sheets for this rug, but you could stick with one or two, or choose as many as you'd like.
Tip: Always wash the sheets before making the rag rug. The sheets should either be 100% cotton or a poly-cotton blend (and the thread count doesn't matter) 
 Step one: Measure and cut a small slit every 3" on each sheet.
Next, tear strips from one end of the sheet to the other.  
 Step two: Safety pin three strips to a pillow, couch cushion or your husband's pant leg, and begin braiding the strips together.
Make sure the end of the strips fall at various lengths. I did this by starting out the first braid with three different strip lengths. When the strip is getting close to the end, cut a one inch opening in the bottom of the strip. Add a new strip by slipping it through the opening and folding down the edge. Continue braiding while tucking the edge underneath.  
After you have braided together all of the strips, make a knot in the beginning and the end.  
 Step Three: Start by pinning from the center of the rug outwards. I decided to stray from the norm and turn this rug into an apple.
Continue pinning until the size of the rug has been achieved. (I roll my braids into a ball to stay organized.)  
Step Four: Hand stitch together each braid with invisible thread and the crafting needle. Stitch back and forth from parallel braids, every inch or so, working from the center outwards.  
That's all there is to it. Enjoy your vintage one-of-a-kind rag rug for years to come. 

Rebekah Greiman is the creator of Potholes and Pantyhose, a web blog dedicated to original DIY projects. Rebekah’s detailed tutorials are written to educate and entertain, while highlighting crafts, home decor, recipes, remodeling and more. See them all at Potholes and Pantyhose.

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How to: Make Homemade, Healthy Spiced Ketchup

by Rebekah Greiman
How to: Make Homemade, Healthy Spiced Ketchup
Hello! I'm Rebekah from Potholes and Pantyhose where I share and photograph detailed tutorials of my DIY projects, recipes, photography tips and remodeling endeavors. I am in the middle of remodeling both our living and dining rooms.

My garden is in full swing and I have a plethora of Roma tomatoes that needed to be used. And, after reading the back of a ketchup bottle one day which listed the third ingredient as High Fructose Corn Syrup and the fourth as Corn Syrup, I knew just what to do.  

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How to: Paint like a Pro

by Rebekah Greiman

How to: Paint like a Pro

Hello! I'm Rebekah from Potholes and Pantyhose where I share and photograph detailed tutorials of my DIY projects, recipes, photography tips and remodeling endeavors. I am in the middle of remodeling both our living and dining rooms.

My husband an I own a few rental properties along with our own home, so I have learned a lot about painting - what works and what doesn't. Today, I'm excited to share a few tips on how to paint like a pro. Though, I'll warn you, once you learn how to paint properly, you will begin to notice shoddy painting and want to talk about it with husbands and friends....who usually aren't that interested in the subject. Unless they're freaks like me.      Here's all that you'll need in order to paint like a pro:

  • Lightweight Spackle
  • Wood Filler 
  • Fine Sand Paper 
  • Primer 
  • Paint (can opener, stir stick) 
  • Painter's 2" Blue Tape 
  • Masking Tape Plastic 
  • Drop Cloth 
  • Brilliant White Acrylic Latex Painter's Caulk-no Silicone and Caulk Gun (I recommend buying one with a tension release lever) 
  • Roller, Roller Cage, Roller Pan & Plastic Liner 
  • 2.5-3" Paintbrush-I recommend Purdy brand because they don't fall apart or leave bristles in the paint   


First things first. Lay out the plastic dropcloth and use the masking tape to tape seams together.
1. Fill nail holes and low spots on the wall using your finger to spread lightweight spackling into the hole.
2. Let the spackling bubble over the surface of the wall a centimeter or two. Once dry, lightly sand the spackling by hand with the sandpaper.
3. Brush a thin coat of primer on all the spackled spots. Let dry.  

Next, use the blue painter's tape to help create a perfect line between the trim and the wall color.
1. Apply the blue painter's tape onto the trim leaving a 1/16 to 1/8" gap between the trim and the wall.
2 (& 4). Using a box knife, cut a slanted tip on the end of the caulk tube. Insert the tube into the caulk gun and begin squeezing out a line of caulk along the edge of the blue tape. Do this process in 6' increments to avoid letting the caulk dry out.
3. With each 6' increment, use the index finger to run along the line of caulk, removing excess caulk. The goal is to create a seal between the wall color and the trim (that the blue painter's tape is protecting). You don't need a huge line of caulk, just enough that the blue tape shows through the caulk and a seal is formed. Have a wet rag handy to wipe your fingers on. It's going to get messy.
4. Continue this process until all windows, doors, crown moulding and floor trim are taped off and caulked.  

Once the caulk is dry, it's time to load your brushes and rollers in preparation to paint.
1. Label the can of paint before you start with a permanent marker. (This will save future headaches of not knowing which paint goes to which room-Lowe's also offers the option to keep track of your paint colors online.) Slowly open the can using a paint key (given to you free at the paint counter) by going around the entire rim of the lid. Lift the lid straight up to avoid drips.
2. Use a stir stick to mix up the paint (even if it's already been mixed in the store). The pigment will settle at the bottom. Pull up from the bottom with the stir stick and then stir in a circular fashion one or two times. Repeat this process until the paint is thoroughly mixed.
3. Properly load a paint brush by dipping into the paint about 1/4" and scraping the brush against both sides on the paint can.
4. Properly load a roller by pouring paint into the paint tray (with liner), using a paint brush to catch drips from the can. Begin by lightly dipping one side of the roller into the paint and dragging the roller back towards you in the pan. Do this several times until the roller is fully loaded all the way around.  

Now that we have our walls prepped, the floor protected and the trim ready to receive paint, it's time to slap on the color!
1. First, you "cut in" the trim before rolling the walls. With your loaded paintbrush, give the brush a slight angle as you "cut in" along the trim. The "cutting in" should be one motion, pulling the paint from left to right (if you are right handed). You shouldn't be brushing back and forth-this will create thick spots and lines in the paint.
2. Some of the paint will be seen on the blue tape-this is exactly why we have the tape and caulk protecting the trim.
3. Next, roll the walls with a loaded roller. Use a "W" pattern as you roll in the walls. This will help avoid lines being formed in the paint.
4. Once the first coat is dry, apply a second coat if need be. Also, scan the walls for "holidays" which are formed by air bubbles in the paint finally popping and leaving behind tiny see-through spots. Touch up where it is necessary.  

Until I am 100% certain that there will be no further touch up, I bag up my brushes and my rollers.
1. Pour all excess paint back into the can, using the brush to make sure you have removed as much as you can from the paint tray liner.
2. Wipe the rim of the paint can so that it can be sealed properly.
3. Tap the lid on with a hammer, going around the entire rim.
4. Bag up the liner, the roller and the brush with plastic bags, sealing them off as much as you can from outside air. This will keep the paint wet in case you missed a spot.  

If you are certain that there will be no further touch up, it's time to clean the brush and roller. 1. Use lukewarm water and a mild soap to clean the brush. If there is stubborn stuck on paint, use a wire brush pulling lightly from the handle towards the edge of the brush.
2. Squeeze the excess water out of the brush or roller.
3. Lay flat to dry (either outside or on a paper towel to protect the surface it's laying on-there often is excess paint that dribbles out over time).  
Now, the reveal!
1. Once the paint is dry, it's time to pull the blue painter's tape from the trim. Do not wait more than 2 days to pull the painter's tape from the trim. Grab one end of the tape and pull towards you with a 27 degree angle (in between a 45 and a 90 degree). Pull slowly allowing the caulk to tear it.
2. If the caulk was applied too thick, it may begin to pull the paint from the wall along with it. If you notice this starting to happen, use a box knife to help create a clean line. If the caulk was applied properly, you will have a beautiful clean line between your wall color and your trim.  

Now that the brushes are clean, the tape has been pulled and everything has been put away, stand back and enjoy the brand new color on your walls. And the fact that you just painted like a pro.  

Thanks again for having me here today. Feel free to stop by my site, Potholes and Pantyhose, for more recipes, crafts and remodeling projects. I would love to hear from you! Love-Rebekah.

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How to: Replace Your Household Cleansers and Beauty Items with Healthful, Homemade Options (with DIY Recipes)

by Rebekah Greiman
How to: Replace Your Household Cleansers and Beauty Items with Healthful, Homemade Options (with DIY Recipes)

Hello! I'm Rebekah from Potholes and Pantyhose where I share and photograph detailed tutorials of my DIY projects, recipes, photography tips and remodeling endeavors. I am in the middle of remodeling both our living and dining rooms.

This year, I've been on a mission to replace most of household cleaners and personal care items by my own homemade versions. I am concocting these household replacements with little more than what I have on hand or what I can find at the organic market. 

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How to: Build an Extra Large DIY Picnic Table

by Rebekah Greiman

How to: Build an Extra Large DIY Picnic Table

Hello! I'm Rebekah from Potholes and Pantyhose where I share and photograph detailed tutorials of my DIY projects, recipes, photography tips and remodeling endeavors. I am in the middle of remodeling both our living and dining rooms.


We inherited a rather large and very wobbly picnic table when we purchased one of our rental properties. It needed a makeover, badly.   I recycled what I could from the existing picnic table-the metal frame-and built a brand new one that seats eight people comfortably.

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