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Anonymous on Oct 25, 2020:

I am in the process of building this bench. I have to assume the author has access to hardware that is not normally found where I am at. A standard 1/2" washer has an O.D. usually around 1 1/4" which means to just make the washer fit you need a counterbore of 1 1/4". Which is what I decided to do but I then did not think about the motorise . Now that I am working on the motorise I see no way you can use a 1 1/4" washer. Even if you had perfectly aligned holes you would blow out the cut for the mortise since it needs to be 1 1/4" deep and a 2x4 is only 1 1/2" deep but remember a fostner bit has a pilot on it that I am sure will peak through that extra 1/4" or so.

I have attempted to located a 1/2" washer with a smaller OD but so far no luck. I may do what another commenter did and size down to 3/8" hardware.

Also note if doing this project, I do not have a drill press and I would not do this one again without a drill press. When making the mortise hole the drill will just about break your arm, plus these plans rely on accuarate holes that just can not be done with a hand drill.


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Elisa on Aug 16, 2020:

I love the way this is built and looks. I am looking for an 'L' shaped bench to be 8' x 10'. 34" deep and 40" tall. w/ bottom shelf all the way around. Can you design this for me?


Thomas on Jul 24, 2020:

Thanks a lot for sharing your design, Chris. I just finished this project and it turned out great. I am brand new to this, so it was a fun first project with a lot of tools I had not used before.

I ended up utilizing a friends miter saw and table saw to make all of the necessary cuts...I doubt I would have had these results if I had tried to use my circular saw.

I was able to complete all of the drilling using my power drill (with built in level) and no drill guide. It worked out nicely, however, it was the slowest part of the project. If folks have a drill press, awesome, but it is definitely not a necessity. I ended up using a jig from scrap 2 x 4 for the 1 1/4" mortises and it worked like a charm to get my drill holes started before actually drilling into the side of the 2 x 4s. I would highly recommend doing that rather than measuring each time.

My biggest mistake was ordering my lumber from Lowes online, rather than picking out the pieces myself. Two of my 2 x 6s came with a pretty significant twist, which is now noticeable on the finished product.

The workbench is incredibly sturdy and I imagine I will get years of use out of it! Thanks again for sharing and sorry for some of the grumpy comments below.


Anonymous on Jul 06, 2020:

Bad bad bad description and specs. You need to center the holes on the top braces otherwise you get blow out. You need to use a drill press for the mortises otherwise you’ll break your wrist with a hand drill. If you want to do more of these education things I suggest fewer close up pics of you drilling (worthless) and more detail.


ben paul on Jun 30, 2020:

did it - LOVE IT!


Shelly Leer on May 20, 2020:

I knew this tutorial was from you. Excellent photos and perfect steps. I'm so happy you now have the ultimate workbench for your tools, hammering space and storage. Plus, I'm just happy to hear you're still tinkering away and found your forever house.


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Denise Severino on May 13, 2020:

i love it


Croc Mclaughlin on Jan 13, 2020:

would love a printable version of instructions


Julian Gray on Dec 31, 2019:

Interesting looking plans - Seems quite high to me - how tall are you ?

I'm in the UK and plan to build something similar - I might struggle to find the right timber. Elsewhere I've seen guidance to only make the top a max of 24" wide - how wide is your bench?

I'd appreciate an engineering drawing if you have made one please :-)


Dave on Dec 30, 2019:

Hi Chris,
I've been looking at many different DIY workbenches and this one looks beautiful! How do I get the downloadable instructions? Thanks again for sharing your plans!


Roque Antonio Barraza Insignares on Aug 20, 2019:

Excelente, felicitaciones por su dedicación a enseñar todo ésto


Jon on Aug 14, 2019:

Decided to build this without the plans, based on your explanation and pictures. Found it quite difficult (I'm a newb!) but its really starting to come together and I think it is going to be a tank when its done. Few issues I encountered that will maybe help the next guy/gal:
- Drilling perfectly straight holes is impossible without a guide. Even drilling through 1.5" for the hole guide/jig was incredibly difficult. I ended up buying a drill guide to assist. If you have access to a drill press it will make your life much easier.
- Drilling straight into the end of the 2x4s to receive the bolts was also challenging, even with the drill block. Couldn't clamp it anywhere so I did my best to hold it in place. Came out OK but not perfect.
- Take your time drilling out the mortises. You need to drill in quite deep to make room for the washer/nut. Most times I was extremely close to blowing out the other side but luckily got through this step relatively unscathed.
- I'm going to add locking caster wheels to each 4x4 leg to make the table maneuverable.
- Finding a number of 8' 2x6s that are straight enough for a glue up is proving to be a big challenge after a couple trips to the yard. Unfortunately don't have access to a jointer and planer so making the table top is going to be tricky... this weekend's project.

I do suggest tackling this project, its going to be nice and solid when it's done with a good amount of storage (I opted to include the bottom shelf).

Biggest takeaway: invest the money and buy the proper tools to build perfectly straight holes. If you try to freehand you'll be left with a mess and a headache!


Robert on Apr 21, 2019:

Thanks a bunch - the email with download instructions came this afternoon.


Pat marin on Mar 20, 2019:

Could you add a little more detail on the shelf please Chris, perhaps a photo from underneath. Am having difficulty visualising how it rests on the frame internally. Great project for me as a newbie!


Harrison on Nov 12, 2018:

Been following these instructions, with some modifications of my own devising, namely using 2x6s for the top rails and stretchers and omitting the front rail to make room for some drawers (plywood forming the floor of the drawer box takes it place).

Being completely uninitiated in carpentry, but being a huge nerd with access to a 3d Printer. I 3d printed some jigs so I'd get the holes drilled spot on :D !


V Kepler on Jul 14, 2018:

Looking at the work bench I noticed a green 18 drawer metal box under the table. I had one and it was left at the house I moved from. Could you please let me know where you found one as I have looked and not been able to locate one. Follow your DIY ideas. hank You.
Val


Nick Braden on May 14, 2018:

Oh I also decided to attach the top with pocket hole screws rather than going all the way through the top stretchers.


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