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Chrisjob on Oct 20, 2017:

@Marc - Thanks for your thoughts.

If you have a table saw, you might try to mill up your own lumber from 2 x 12s from the home center. If you cut from the outside, you'll essentially end up with quartersawn stock.

These likely aren't kiln dried or seasoned, but if you're in South Texas and the humidity is low, it should dry out pretty quickly.


Marc S on Oct 20, 2017:

@Bryan I would imagine the bottom shelf (if added) would also keep the bottom stretchers from pivoting. If no bottom shelf was added, then I would question the same about the pivoting.

Looking forward to doing this project as well. The lumber in my area (South TX) is TERRIBLE, lots of knots and lots of bows in the lumber. I've been reading up on this project and making notes for over a month. At the same time I've been searching for decent lumber at Lowes and HD (we don't have any mom and pop shops in town).

@Chris - Thanks for these plans, the bench is beautiful. By the time mine is done it will look like yours, especially the right side.

2012 Giant Anthem
2015 Giant Fast 1 SLR flat bar roadie.
Origin 8 SS


Chrisjob on Oct 17, 2017:

@Bryan - Please say more. What 2x4 are you referring to? The cross members, going along the width of the bench? These are secured by the top, Also, that's why we take the time to use the bedbolt system. If they ever do need tightened up, that can be done in five minutes or less.


Bryan on Oct 17, 2017:

With only one point of fastening on each of the cross members, how do they not pivot? Is the torque on one bolt on each end enough to stop the other end of the sliding if given a good knock? I like the cleaned up look of the bench, but it just seems odd not to have two points of fastening through a 2x4. Wouldn't it at least make sense to alternate top and bottom on each side? As in a bolt goes through the upper half of the cross member on the left side and a bolt goes through the lower half of the cross member on the right side? Thanks, looking to get this going soon


Chrisjob on Oct 05, 2017:

Hey James,

In woodworking, a bunch of edge-glued pieces like this are referred to, very practically, as a "glued up block." So the blocks are - attached pieces 1,2,3 and attached pieces 4+5. I can see how that was confusing in the directions, and I apologize that I didn't make it clearer.

How about this:
- Glue board 1 and 2 together. Let cure. Add 3. This is now glued-up block X.
- Glue boards 4 and 5 together. This is now glued-up block Y.
- Glue blocks X and Y together.

Thanks!
Chris


James on Oct 05, 2017:

Chris,
Quick question about the table top... You wrote "I first glued up boards one and two, then added number three. Then, boards four and five were glued together, and lastly, the two blocks were attached to form the final top." What are the two blocks you refer to? Trying to visualize this but I'm probably missing something obvious...

Thanks in advance.


Chrisjob on Sep 24, 2017:

@andrew - Hi there. Send me an email at Chris @ [siteurl] and explain a little more what's going on and we can hopefully figure out your issues. If you can snap and share a few pics, that'd be helpful.


Andrew S Medina on Sep 24, 2017:

My dry fit is a disaster. Can't even push it all together, much less get everything flush. I used a pilot hole and drill guide for all my holes. How could it be that off on so many holes? I know I'm not an expert but it shouldn't be this bad. Thoughts? Suggestions? I really don't want to have to scrap the whole thing.


scott on Sep 18, 2017:

Hi Chris - I love this design and am currently putting the supplies together to build it. One thing I think is worth mentioning re: the washers - you mention 1/2" internal diameter (ID), but they also need to have an OD of maximum 1-1/4" to fit in the counter bore holes! Most of the 1/2" washers I found at the Home Depot had an OD of at least 1-1/2", I had to search for quite some time to find some that would work.
(I am also very envious of the wood you found, I ended up buying some more expensive kiln-dried cedar from Lowe's because all of the other wood at HD was really knotty and ugly.) I still have some knots but am planning on filling them with epoxy to get a nice smooth surface. Thanks for the design, it's a real inspiration!


Chrisjob on Aug 14, 2017:

@Wm - Fair point. Yes, the four aren't exact matches. But since it's a through-hole, it doesn't affect the layout of the bolt holes. They're placed at the same point on each leg. But you would need to select which side the counterbores go on.

I'll see what I can do to update the image in the plans.


bill on Aug 14, 2017:

I entered my name and e-mail address and nothing happens


Wm on Aug 14, 2017:

My apologies, you should delete that post.

Here is a picture of what I mean. Shouldn't it look like this?

http://imgur.com/a/uAokv


Wm on Aug 14, 2017:

I misspoke. 2 of the holes must face their partners on each leg.

O O
-O---------O-
| |
| |
O O
-O ---------O-

Or am I crazy?


Chrisjob on Aug 14, 2017:

@Greg - the floor in my garage isn't level either, so I'm the exact same position. If its more than an inch or so, you could get a box level out and test your base, cutting the legs to fit before you attach the top. I simply cut a few thin slices from my leftover 4x4 and used them under the legs. Blends perfectly into the design. They're actually in the photos above.

@Bill - Sorry you're having trouble. If you head here, https://curbly.activehosted.com/f/9 and insert your name and email, a download should start automatically. What are you seeing?

@Wm - Thanks for your comment, but I'm not sure I follow. There are definitely only four holes in each of the legs, and the each are drilled all the way through. Why would you need eight holes to attach four cross members?


Wm on Aug 13, 2017:

So, following your instructions, which are great, except I've come to discover that two of the legs in the plans should have 8 mirroring holes, otherwise you cannot connect the 2 sides. My sanity check came to late!


Bill on Aug 13, 2017:

I really like the workbench and I tried to download the plans but was unable to do so. Could you please send me a direct download link for the plans. Thank you


Greg on Aug 07, 2017:

I really like this plan. I want to put this in my basement. My floor is not level and I don't want to mess up the clean look with shims and I don't want a wobbly bench. Any suggestions?


bill on Aug 05, 2017:

I am unable to download the plans


Chrisjob on Jul 12, 2017:

Hi Jim -

Great question. You certainly could use lag bolts and washers to attach the crossmembers to the legs.

The drawback here is that you won't be able to tighten up your bench over the years, and it will start to wobble a bit as the wood expands and contracts with environment changes. I built mine 11 months ago, and it has already benefited from one tightening.

Is it totally necessary? I don't think so. I intend to use this thing for a very long time, and so it was worth the extra work to me. It only took about an additional 90 minutes to layout, drill, and chisel. Spread over the next twenty years, that investment of time was a no-brainer.

If you try the lag bolt option, I'd love to hear how it goes. Please share your bench with us when you're done.

Thanks!
Chris


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