Make it: Hip Hemp Pendant Lamps

by Kelly B

Make it: Hip Hemp Pendant Lamps

The entryway to my home is small, but I love the idea of having some sort of statement piece present. Every space needs a little interest, but because all the real estate I can offer is in ceiling height I'm mainly limited to a killer light fixture. The second I saw this project for hemp pendant lamps I knew I'd found the one to fit my style. And my champagne tastes can rest easy, knowing that I'll be spending less than on a nice dinner out!

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How to: Make a Modern Paper Lamp Shade

by Chris Gardner

How to: Make a Modern Paper Lamp Shade

Q: What's more fun than a brightly colored, modern, pleated paper lamp shade?

A: A brightly colored, modern, pleated paper lamp shade you made yourself!

Because paper is somewhat rigid and requires only minimal interior framing, it is perfect for making lamp shades. You start this project with a rectangular sheet of paper, pleat it in two different directions, and then, to make a sphere, reshape the pleats by arching them open one row at a time—no cutting involved. It’s a really cool process with beautiful results. This project comes to Curbly from the fantastic new book, Modern Paper Crafts by Margaret Van Sicklen.

SUPPLIES

  • Practice paper: One 8½"-wide x 11"-long sheet of copy paper 
  • One 24"-wide x 37"-long rectangle of thin, crisp, translucent paper 
  • 24" metal ruler 
  • Pencil Bone or wood folder 
  • Removable tape 
  • Glue stick 
  • ¹⁄8"-round paper punch 
  • Kitchen twine
  • lamp kit
created at: 06/15/2011

1. Measure and mark the outside edges of the practice paper. Then, starting at the top of the paper and working your way down, fold the marked alternating mountain and valley folds in Drawing.  Use a bone folder to crease the folded edges flat. The resulting pleats will overlap, like pleats in a kilt.

created at: 06/15/2011

2. In this step, the pleating technique produces stacked pleats all the same size that sit atop one another like pleats in a closed fan. Mark 1" increments for 7" at the top and bottom edges. Starting on the left edge and working across the paper, mountain-fold and then valley-fold the marked lines. Use a bone folder to firmly crease the folded edges flat. Then rotate the paper, so it’s horizontal, with the long extending edge positioned at the back.

created at: 06/15/2011

3. Holding the paper firmly where marked with stars, pull the center pleats, and then the surrounding pleats, outward in an arc. Continue to shape the paper by arching the pleats of each row. Isn’t that cool? I love shaping these pleats and seeing a sphere emerge (note that the practice sheet produces a quarter-slice of a sphere).

created at: 06/15/2011

4. Now that you have successfully completed the practice pleats, repeat Step 1 to measure and mark your paper for the lamp shade. To reinforce the paper’s top edge, fold this edge 1" to the back side so that the shade’s edge will be double-layered. Continue to work your way down the paper as you did with the practice paper, mountain-folding and valley-folding the marked lines. Since this paper is much larger than your practice sheet, I suggest using removable tape to hold the pleats in place as you work. Otherwise the pleats can splay out, and things can get out of whack quickly. To secure the pleats, place long vertical strips of tape across several pleats at a time, spacing the tape about every 8" to 10".

created at: 06/15/2011

5. Repeat step 2 to fold the vertical stacked pleats every inch, alternating the mountain and valley folds and stacking the pleats accurately atop one another. In the left upper corner of the stacked pleats, punch a hole about ¼" down and in from the edge through all the pleats.

6. Thread a piece of twine through the hole, and cinch the top of the shade. Loosely tie the twine in a bow rather than a knot since you may need to adjust the size of the opening.

7. To begin shaping the sphere, remove the tape securing the pleats, and overlap the end pleats, right over left, so the seam sits in the valley of the pleat. Once you’ve seen how to position the seam, lift up the upper edge, and swipe glue stick along the lower edge. Reposition the edges to make the seam, this time interlocking the horizontal pleats on the back of one edge with the horizontal pleats on the front of the other edge, so the form appears continuous. Pinch the top and bottom edges together until the glue sets.

8. Once the glue has set, repeat step 3 to shape the sphere. Holding the paper firmly, pull each pleat in one row outward in an arc. Continue shaping the pleats of each row into arcs. Take your time as you move through the shaping process, and be sure that the shade is evenly shaped on all sides (looking at the shape in profile will help you see if it’s balanced). I like to hang this shade as one of a group of pendant lights, placing it over an inexpensive shade that’s fire-resistant. And keep in mind that the heat from the bulb needs to escape through the top of the shade, so don’t cinch the top too tight.

When attaching this lamp shade to a light source, always follow the UL-recommended maximum wattage on the fixture and shade. Do not use this shade with a halogen or quartz lamp as they get much too hot. The least complicated way to use this shade is to slip it over a premade shade, adhering the two by placing beads of tack glue, such as Aleene's Tacky Glue, at the top and bottom edges of the premade shade. Don’t cinch the top or bottom of your shade tightly. Leave an opening, so the heat from the bulb can escape and air can circulate. The other option is to secure the pleated shade to a metal frame. For the pendant-style lamp pictured, purchase a frame fitted with a butterfly clip that snaps over the bulb. Using a needle threaded with cord, stitch around the inside edge, catching both the lamp shade and the ring at the top of the frame with each stitch. Again, don’t cinch the top or bot¬tom tightly, and leave an opening, so the heat from the bulb can escape and air can circulate.

Learn more about Modern Paper Crafts at Melanie Falick Books, and about Margaret Van Sicklen at her website.

Modern Paper Crafts: A 21st-Century Guide to Folding, Cutting, Scoring, Pleating, and Recycling by Margaret Van Sicklen, published by STC Craft | Melanie Falick Books, an imprint of Stewart, Tabori & Chang, 2011.

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How To: DIY Spherical Base Lamp

by Chris Gardner

How To: DIY Spherical Base Lamp

Brooke says, "I have seen some SAWEEEEEET lamps out there right now with spheres on the lamp bases. I wanted to try and make my own version, but it has taken me a few weeks to come up with a worthy alternative for the lamp base. If I used styrofoam, it wouldn't look smooth. If I used circles of wood, it would cost too much."

And then she figured it out, and the results are mighty clever. Can you guess what she used?

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Accordion Bedside Lamp + Headboard Tutorial

by DIY Maven

Room View

I am grooving on this bedroom vignette from West Elm. Especially the accordion lamp ($129). It frees up the bedside table and would seem to provide light right where you need it for reading. Loving the all the other stuff in the room too, especially the ruffly shams and comforter ($29-169). Like the headboard? Check

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Five Original Ways to Use String Lights

by Peaches2010

Five Original Ways to Use String Lights

Who doesn’t love the twinkle of string lights? They lend oodles of atmosphere to any environment.

Good News: String lights are on clearance right now! You can save some major cheese by stocking up right now. 

Bad News: When displayed plain and lonely, string lights tend to read a little too HAPPY HOLIDAYS! Or worse, WELCOME TO MY DORM ROOM.

Solution: Get creative. With the addition of a few inexpensive items you probably already have around...

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How To: Make a Tord Boontje-Inspired Garland Light (for $3.00 and in under 10 minutes)

by Chris Gardner

How To: Make a Tord Boontje-Inspired Garland Light (for $3.00 and in under 10 minutes)

Tord Boontje is a Dutch designer famous for his intricate, elegant cut designs, and one of Peaches' favorite artists. She says, "One of Boontje's best known commercial pieces in this beautiful Garland Light. If you have visited a museum gift shop in the last 4 years, you have probably seen one in person. They usually retail for around $100.00, which is surprisingly affordable considering all the awards its won, but still, I knew I could make one for less. Actually, $97 less."

That's right. She created this pendant lamp in no time, and for under $3.00.  

"Yup, this light cost exactly $3.00 and all materials can be purchased from the dollar store, or in my case, Ikea."

Materials:

  • $1.00, string of white twinkle lights (50 bulbs)
  • $2.00, two wire garlands (5 yards each, 30' total)
  • Free, one wire coat hanger (I like the skinny white ones)
  • Free, dental floss or thread to hang

 

See how it's done on AuntPeaches.com

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Beer Bottle Pendant Lights

by DIY Maven

Beer Bottle Pendant Lights

Have you noticed that when something is billed as 'hand-crafted' it's often code for diy-able? Take these beer bottle pendant lights from Kix Studio for example. Entitled Flaschenlampe, the lights were constructed out of beer and soda bottles found in the streets of Berlin. To do a diy version, we'd need

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Hardware Store Decor: Toilet Plunger Lamp

by DIY Maven

Upcycled glowing Toilet plunger Lamp!

And here we thought plungers were only good for one thing! Cityup uses the ubiquitous toilet unclogger to make a modern and--dare I say?--stylish lamp. Cityup has identified the project as an 'up-cycled' one, but I'd probably opt for a new plunger if I were going to make it, because the idea of repurposing a previously-used plunger makes me gag.

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Two Silver Leaf Lamp Makeovers

by Mod Home Ec Teacher

Two Silver Leaf Lamp Makeovers

As far as I know nobody but nobody decorates with shiny brass anymore. That means there's a boatload of cast-off brass lamps available for transformation. Abby saw beyond the brass, got to work with some silver leaf, and spruced up this reject to a more understated elegance. Now it coordinates with another one of her rescued lamp makeovers.

So these are the BEFORE pics.

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