The Wabi-Sabi Home: Learn to Embrace Imperfection and Authenticity

by M.E. Gray

Wabi-sabi home

I used to own this cup and saucer set. It was white with a yellow border - I found it at the thrift store. The handle of the cup was comfortable, and the saucer large. I loved it. I loved it in a way that it seemed to make my coffee taste better in the morning. One day, my yellow cup met a fate that many ceramic dishes face. It was dropped, and the cup cracked. The vessel was still usable after its accident, after a bit of gluing. But it never looked the same again. A piece of the ceramic was missing, a chunk gone. I still held onto it, because I loved this cup, and life happens, you know? This is, roughly, the definition of wabi-sabi.              

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5 Amazing Japanese-Inspired DIY Projects

by Con Modern Diy

5 Amazing Japanese-Inspired DIY Projects

The Japanese aesthetic has been hugely influential in Western art since the time of Van Gogh.  And, you guessed it, this aesthetic continues to be a powerful force in the mainstream DIY and craft culture, even beyond the ubiquity of gorgeous Japanese washi tape and origami.  From traditional techniques aimed at solving quotidian challenges to those pushing the limits of modern craftmanship and art, Japan offers incredible inspiration for DIYers...

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Make Japanese Kusudama Paper Flowers

by DIY Maven

Make Japanese Kusudama Paper Flowers

These exquisite flowers come to us by way of Folding Trees. In this tutorial, we're introduced the art of Japanese kusudama, which, traditionally, are used to make balls into which are deposited incense or potpourri. I actually prefer the look of the individual flowers, but if you're interested in assembling them into a ball, Folding Trees provides that tutorial as well.

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Tutorial: Noren - Traditional Japanese Fabric Dividers.

by Chris Gardner

Japanese sewing machine company Janome offers a great tutorial and a bit of info on noren (æš–ç°¾) : traditional japanese fabric dividers that are hung on walls, windows, doorways, or in between rooms. Simply join the pieces, hem, then reinforce by sewing a triangle. They provide tips for adding traditional embroidery, but I think they look mighty sharp in a basic mod fabric, as below, from Whip Up.

Tutorial: Noren - Traditional Japanese Fabric Dividers.

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