Curbly Original
5-Minute DIY! Update any Pillow with Floral Patches

by Holly Wade

5-Minute DIY! Update any Pillow with Floral Patches

It's strange to see 90s styles coming back to life, but I'm loving the nostalgia it brings and how it's evolved. Patches are back in style but not just the novelty ones you iron onto jean jackets. Today's patches come in so many different styles, including intricate floral applique patches that are often used around clothing necklines. Instead of using those patches for their intended use, I thought they'd be perfect for outlining the corners of a pillow! This project was so easy to make that I finished in just 5 minutes.

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Curbly Original
DIY This: How To Make Super Sweet Ice Cream Patches

by M.E. Gray

DIY custom patches with a sweet twist - they're all about ice cream!

I scream, you scream, what's the deal with all this screaming? July is National Ice Cream month, which is just perfect because the temperatures keep rising. A hot day is the perfect excuse for an icy scoop or two. To celebrate my love for all things tasty and sweet, I'm wearing my heart on my sleeve. Or rather, I'm wearing it on my denim vest. Here are three ways to create custom patches, all of which are ice cream themed.  

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Curbly Original
Sew Yourself a Pair of Shorts in Under an Hour!

by M.E. Gray

How to sew shorts without needing a pattern

I have a really hard time buying shorts. I usually can't find any in the store that I like, because, let's face it - most women's shorts are so short they're actually just denim underwear in disguise. Even if I do find shorts I like, I can't seem to bring myself to pay $25 for an article of clothing that requires so little fabric, and that I'm only going to wear for a few months out of the year. Fortunately, you can sew shorts on your own really easily. I made these without a pattern, got to pick out my own funky and fun fabric, and more importantly, I made them as long as I wanted them to be.     

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Curbly Original
How to Transform a T-Shirt: Three Ways

by M.E. Gray

T-Shirt DIY Ideas: How to Transform a T-Shirt Three Ways

The moment the temperature outside starts reaching 90º is the same moment I start reaching for my scissors. Not a summer has passed where I haven't cut the sleeves off a tee or turned jeans into jorts (isn't that the best word ever?). With some scissors and a bit of thread, you can turn a boring tee that you may have otherwise thrown out into your new favorite top. There are a million ways to cut up and refashion a t-shirt - here are three of my favorite t-shirt DIY ideas.       

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Curbly Original
How to: Repurpose an Old Drying Rack into a Stylish Magazine Rack

by Jennifer Farley

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

I love to read magazine and so does my family. Long live the paper subscription! So, I wanted magazine storage for our living room to keep them all in one place. So, let's get to it: how to make a simple and stylish wood and leather magazine rack. 

 First the research: I am really drawn leather and brass/gold magazine racks like this one.

DIY Leather Luggage Rack
AEMCateer.com

I was originally going to attempt this with a vintage folding tray table but realized quickly a folding tray table is too tall for magazine rack. My second thought was a luggage rack, but they also weren't the right height or width.

But then! I pulled into a garage sale and found the below clothes drying rack and thought, hmm.... this thing actually might work.

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

The funny thing is this drying rack (I think) is the cheapest one you can by at a discount store. I got lucky with a garage sale price but I will link to a new option in the materials list.

materials

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

Here is what you need:

  • Wooden clothes drying rack. Here is a great one from Amazon
  • leather, vinyl, or upholstery fabric. I chose this faux leather from Joann's
  • hot glue gun or sewing machine
  • gold spray paint
  • hand saw or multi tool
  • chain or string
  • cutting pliers (optional)
  • thumbtacks
  • scissors (not pictured)
  • ruler 

Step

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

Take apart your drying rack and set the aside the dowels. Now, we need to cut it up. There are many ways to do this, but through trial and error (and a few mistakes) this is how I did it:

The bottom half of the rack would become the side pieces of the rack. It is hard to tell in pictures but we cut underneath the grommet at a 90 degree angle. To truly get a 90 degree angle we needed a little more freedom of movement from the accordion rack. To get this we FIRST cut the rack where you see the pink Xs. 

Step

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

After you have made the cuts to give the rack freedom you can adjust the piece of wood you are cutting of to make a nice clean 90 degree cut under the grommet. Cut one side, then flip it over and cut the other side.

 I originally tried to keep the grommets since the dowel rods where made to fit in them, but it was hard because the grommets went through both pieces of wood. The dowel rods are made to be smaller where they are to be inserted. I decided I could drill holes in faster time than to figure out how to remove/cut the grommet and sand down the freshly cut dowel rods to fit.

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

Here is what one side should look like when it is cut. You will need two of these. The middle grommet is your connecting point. Since we cut of the top grommets the distance from the grommet to the end of the wood is not the same on this side. This was actually better for the structure of the magazine rack. Use the longer side to be the base of the magazine rack and the shorter side to be the top. This will allow the leather/fabric of the magazine rack to hang down a little more.

Step

Repeat Steps 1-2 on the opposite side of the drying rack. Make sure both sides are the same length.

Step

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

You now have two Xs which are the two sides of your magazine rack. Drill holes in each end of one side of the magazine rack. To make sure they match, stack them and drill both at the same time.  Then lay the side with drilled holes on top of the side with no holes and mark where the holes should be drilled (not pictured). Drill the holes on the second side of the magazine rack.  It is important to measure well so your dowel rods will be level when inserted.

Step

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

Now it is time to measure the dowel rods. I used a magazine to estimate my length. I wanted it to be a bit larger than the magazine just in case I wanted to store big coffee table books as well. 

The length is up to you, but I wanted my magazine rack (the exposed part) to be 17 inches wide. In measuring, I had to take into consideration that I would cut off the sanded ends.  I cut off the grommets in Step 2 so I needed both sides of the dowel to be the same thickness. Before measured, I cut these off. (not pictured)

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

Your two dowel rods will be different lengths due to one being inserted into the inside of the rack and one being inserted into the outside of the rack. I wanted my dowel rods to be inserted all the way through the wood to be flush with the outside of the rack. The depth of my wood was 1/4 inch. The bottom dowel was easy. I needed to cut the dowel 17.5 inches.

The top dowel had to be 1 inch longer because it had to extend the length of two of the .25 inch deep pieces on each side totaling .5 inches more on each side.  I cut it 18 inches. [17inches + .5 + .5 = 18 inches]

Summary: Whatever your measurement cut one dowel 1/2 inch longer than the other.

 

Step

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

Cut your dowel rods. The picture shows me cutting three rods, but I learned later that you only need to cut two. Use a clamp to tighten them down. I used my multi-tool to cut them down. You could use a hacksaw or chop saw.

Step

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

 

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

 

To keep the magazine rack from closing you need to secure the sides. I used my snippers to cut an old necklace I had.

Step

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

 

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

 

I used thumb tacks to secure the chain. Any chain would work or you could also use a small strip of your leather/fabric or string.

To make sure each side opens the same measure where you place the thumb tacks from the grommet.

Step

 

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

 

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

 

Insert your dowel rods and secure them with glue. I squeezed a little hot glue in the hole before I inserted the dowel rod. 

I added thumbtacks to the outside of my rack where the dowel was showing to get it a more finished look.

Step

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

Spray paint your magazine rack.

Note: You can spray paint your parts separately and install the finished rack after the leather/fabric part is sewn.

Step

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

Now, it is time to cut your leather.  I couldn't find a large enough piece of cognac leather in the remnant pile at our local leather store so I chose to use vinyl faux leather in a caramel color. I am always amazed at how far vinyl has come in looking like leather. I found mine at Joann Fabric.

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

Cut the fabric into two pieces. I noticed my inspiration piece had the finished side of the leather on both sides of the magazine rack. If you are using real leather this step is optional. You might like the look of your magazine rack to have the softer side of the leather on the inside. If you want the finished side seen on the outside and inside then cut two pieces. I had to use two pieces because the unfinished side of faux leather is not pretty. Your measurements will depend on the size of your magazine rack. Here are the sizes of the two pieces I cut.

The exposed part of my inserted dowel is 17 inches. I wanted the dowel to have 1/4 inch on each side of exposed dowel. The smaller piece will be cut the exact width of the finished product. You will fold the sizes of the larger piece over this smaller piece.

Step

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

Place the the two "wrong sides" of the fabric/leather together. Place the smaller piece in the middle. There should be two inches of leather to fold on the top and the bottom. There should be one inch to fold on each side.

Step

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

 

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

 

Fold the sides in 1/2 inch and sew or glue.

For these next steps you can sew or you can use glue. If you are going to put heavy books in the rack I would suggest sewing. Mine will only hold 3-5 magazines and hot glue/super glue is sturdy enough for this.

Step

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

Fold the folded side another 1/2 inch to finish off the sides.

Step

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

Take the top and fold the top side over the dowel rod and glue. I made sure I cut straight lines on my vinyl so I didn't have to fold over twice on the top.

Note: If you have not assembled your magazine rack then this would be where you would place the fabric on the dowel rods and assemble your stand.

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

You are done! All you need are some magazines.

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

 

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

 

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

The magazine rack is quite sturdy and can hold more magazines than shown.

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

I love how this little project turned out. Who knew it came from an old drying rack!

DIY Leather Magazine Rack
Pin It: DIY Faux Leather Magazine Rack

 

I love a good repurpose. The drying rack has enough parts to make a couple of these, so I think I'll do a few more!

 

Want another fun DIY project? Check out his adorable kitchen utensil wall art here on Curbly.

 

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Curbly Original
How to Sew Outdoor Chair Cushions in 30 Minutes or Less

by Holly Wade

How to Sew Outdoor Chair Cushions in 30 Minutes or Less

As the warm weather continues to emerge, I'm looking forward to spending more time outdoors and enjoying our front porch. Last summer, we purchased inexpensive metal chairs, but since metal is not very comfortable to sit on, I finally got around to making a set of leave printed chair cushions. The best part is you can sew outdoor chair cushions in 30 minutes or less with a few specific materials and this envelope style pillow case. 

 How long it takes you will depend on your skill level, but as someone who is not an expert, I can assure you this should not take more than 30 minutes to make, so it's a perfect "quick" project or a perfect project for beginners. This envelope style pillow case is very simple to make because it does not require zippers or stuffing, and you can easily remove the covers for washing anytime. 

How to Sew Outdoor Chair Cushions in 30 Minutes or Less

The key materials I suggest for this project are outdoor fabric (more durable, thick) and densified polyester pad in your desired size. I used a brand called NuFoam in size 15 x 17, 2 inches thick and simply trimmed it to my desired size because they did not sell the exact size. I found this to be the best material because it's very light, washable and water will run right through it (as opposed to solid foam). 

I ended up with size 15 x 16 cushions, so make sure you adjust your sizes accordingly. The materials below are per cushion. 

How to Sew Outdoor Chair Cushions in 30 Minutes or Less

Materials:

  • NuFoam densified polyester pad, size 15 x 17, 2 inches thick
  • 1 yard outdoor fabric
  • Scissors/rotary cutter
  • Pins
  • Matching thread
  • Sewing machine

How to Sew Outdoor Chair Cushions in 30 Minutes or Less

Step

First, cut the pad to the size of the chair. In my case, I cut about 1 inch off to create a 15 x 16 pad. Because the pads have layers, it's easiest to cut only a little bit at a time. 

How to Sew Outdoor Chair Cushions in 30 Minutes or Less

Step

Then cut one piece of fabric that is about 2 inches wider around than the pad (17 x 18 inches in this case), one piece that is 18 x 10 inches and one more that is 18 x 12 inches. These two pieces will create an envelope flap, so one should be slightly larger than the other.

How to Sew Outdoor Chair Cushions in 30 Minutes or Less

Step

On the larger flap (18 x 12), pin a thin seam along the 18-inch side and sew. 

How to Sew Outdoor Chair Cushions in 30 Minutes or Less

Step

Pin all of the pieces together with patterned sides facing in and the sewn edge as the inner-most piece. This will be the one you see when the pillowcase is complete (see above).

Step

Sew a thin seam all the way around the pillowcase without stopping, back stitching at each end. Trim loose threads. 

How to Sew Outdoor Chair Cushions in 30 Minutes or Less

Step

Turn the pillowcase right side out and insert the foam piece. Place the cushion envelope-side down on a chair and lounge comfortably! 

When it's time to wash them, simply remove the foam piece and wash all pieces. They're super easy to make and take care of, and they're just as stylish as store-bought cushions!

 

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Curbly Original
How to Sew Outdoor Chair Cushions in 30 Minutes or Less

by Holly Wade

How to Sew Outdoor Chair Cushions in 30 Minutes or Less

As the warm weather continues to emerge, I'm looking forward to spending more time outdoors and enjoying our front porch. Last summer, we purchased inexpensive metal chairs, but since metal is not very comfortable to sit on, I finally got around to making a set of leave printed chair cushions. The best part is you can sew outdoor chair cushions in 30 minutes or less with a few specific materials and this envelope style pillow case. 

 How long it takes you will depend on your skill level, but as someone who is not an expert, I can assure you this should not take more than 30 minutes to make, so it's a perfect "quick" project or a perfect project for beginners. This envelope style pillow case is very simple to make because it does not require zippers or stuffing, and you can easily remove the covers for washing anytime. 

How to Sew Outdoor Chair Cushions in 30 Minutes or Less

The key materials I suggest for this project are outdoor fabric (more durable, thick) and densified polyester pad in your desired size. I used a brand called NuFoam in size 15 x 17, 2 inches thick and simply trimmed it to my desired size because they did not sell the exact size. I found this to be the best material because it's very light, washable and water will run right through it (as opposed to solid foam). 

I ended up with size 15 x 16 cushions, so make sure you adjust your sizes accordingly. The materials below are per cushion. 

How to Sew Outdoor Chair Cushions in 30 Minutes or Less

Materials:

  • NuFoam densified polyester pad, size 15 x 17, 2 inches thick
  • 1 yard outdoor fabric
  • Scissors/rotary cutter
  • Pins
  • Matching thread
  • Sewing machine

How to Sew Outdoor Chair Cushions in 30 Minutes or Less

Step

First, cut the pad to the size of the chair. In my case, I cut about 1 inch off to create a 15 x 16 pad. Because the pads have layers, it's easiest to cut only a little bit at a time. 

How to Sew Outdoor Chair Cushions in 30 Minutes or Less

Step

Then cut one piece of fabric that is about 2 inches wider around than the pad (17 x 18 inches in this case), one piece that is 18 x 10 inches and one more that is 18 x 12 inches. These two pieces will create an envelope flap, so one should be slightly larger than the other.

How to Sew Outdoor Chair Cushions in 30 Minutes or Less

Step

On the larger flap (18 x 12), pin a thin seam along the 18-inch side and sew. 

How to Sew Outdoor Chair Cushions in 30 Minutes or Less

Step

Pin all of the pieces together with patterned sides facing in and the sewn edge as the inner-most piece. This will be the one you see when the pillowcase is complete (see above).

Step

Sew a thin seam all the way around the pillowcase without stopping, back stitching at each end. Trim loose threads. 

How to Sew Outdoor Chair Cushions in 30 Minutes or Less

Step

Turn the pillowcase right side out and insert the foam piece. Place the cushion envelope-side down on a chair and lounge comfortably! 

When it's time to wash them, simply remove the foam piece and wash all pieces. They're super easy to make and take care of, and they're just as stylish as store-bought cushions!

 

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Curbly Original
The Three Easiest Ways to Make a Simple Market Tote Bag

by Holly Wade

Three Ways to Make an Upcycled Market Bag

I'm a sucker for a farmer's market or swap meet, and I've become very aware of bringing my own bags since California passed a law requiring you to pay for plastic bags at grocery stores. To use the materials I already had, I found three super simple ways to make an upcycled market bag: use stuff I already have! This transforms standard items into something practical using minimal cuts and sewing.  

I'll share how to turn a regular t-shirt, bedroom pillowcase and bath towel into useful bags for farmer's markets, groceries or just about anything else. None of them require you to sew more than a simple straight line, so they're ready in minutes!

Three Ways to Make an Upcycled Market Bag

1. Upcycled T-Shirt Market Bag

Keep in mind that a larger t-shirt yields a much larger bag, so something medium-sized is ideal. You should also avoid stretchy fabrics.

Materials:

  • Medium cotton t-shirt (solid is best but not required)
  • Scissors or rotary cutter
  • Sewing machine
  • Matching thread

Step

Lay on a safe cutting surface. Use the rotary cutter or a pair of scissors to cut off the sleeves and cut out the neckline.

Three Ways to Make an Upcycled Market Bag

Step

Turn the cut t-shirt inside out now.

Three Ways to Make an Upcycled Market Bag

Step

Using your sewing machine, sew a straight seam across the bottom of the t-shirt, back stitching at each end.  

Step

Turn the t-shirt right side out and you have a completed bag! 

Three Ways to Make an Upcycled Market Bag

2. Upcycled Pillowcase Bag

This one is my favorite. I have so many old pillowcases from bedding that I never use, and this requires ZERO sewing unless you want to decorate it, which you absolutely can!

Materials:

  • Standard queen-sized pillowcase
  • Scissors or rotary cutter
  • Measuring tape or ruler
  • Chalk (optional)

Step

Iron the pillowcase flat and lay on a cutting mat or safe cutting surface.

Three Ways to Make an Upcycled Market Bag

Step

Consider the size of the pillowcase. Length will be the total length of the bag. Cut about 6 inches off the top, open end of the pillow case. 

Three Ways to Make an Upcycled Market Bag

Step

Measure about 2 inches down and mark with chalk. Then use the chalk or a pencil to mark a 6-inch line that is in the middle of the pillowcase. Use scissors or a rotary cutter to cut on the line, which should leave at least 5 inches on either side of the opening.

That slit becomes that handle and you suddenly have a bag with no sewing at all. However, keep in mind this bag may not hold as much weight due to the possibility that the handle could rip over time.  

Three Ways to Make an Upcycled Market Bag

 

3. Upcycled Towel Tote

This DIY is also great for a beach bag! No matter what you use it for, this towel tote is very useful and will probably be the largest and sturdiest of these three options. 

Materials:

  • Medium-weight bath towel
  • Scissors or rotary cutter
  • Sewing machine
  • Matching thread
  • Measuring tape or ruler

Step

Fold the towel lengthwise inside-out (if applicable).

Three Ways to Make an Upcycled Market Bag

Step

Consider the size of the towel. The folded version will be the length and width of the bag, with the fold being the bottom. Use the scissors to trim top and side as needed (about 15 inches wide, 18 inches tall).

Three Ways to Make an Upcycled Market Bag

Step

Sew straight seams on each side of the bag (keep in mind thickness of the fabric for machine settings). Back stitch at each end to secure. Turn right side out now. 

Three Ways to Make an Upcycled Market Bag

Step

Lay the towel flat on a cutting mat or safe cutting surface. Measure about 2 inches from the open top and mark with chalk or a pencil. Then use a ruler to mark and cut a 6-inch line across the bag. This will make the handles.

Now the bag is ready to use!

And there you have it! No matter what materials you have in the house, you can probably turn it into a bag with just a few quick cuts and seams. Certain fabrics will provide more stability for holding certain items, so always keep in mind what you'll use the bags for. 

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Curbly Original
Make It! Simple + Stylish Leather Headphone Organizer

by Holly Wade

DIY Round Leather Headphone Organizer

I use my headphones every day, and I carry them to work in my purse, where, despite my best efforts to roll them up carefully, they inevitably intertwine into a balled-up mess. To prevent my headphone from becoming consistently tangled, I made this simple round leather headphone organizer that stores my lightly coiled headphones and slips easily into my purse or just as easily into a large pocket.  

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Curbly Original
Pack your Lunch in Style: Easy Reusable Fabric Lunch Bag

by Holly Wade

Pack your Lunch in Style: Easy Reusable Fabric Lunch Bag

Remembering to pack my lunch is a constant struggle. I don’t think I’ve even had an actual lunch bag for years, but it turned out that all I needed to get me motivated to pack my lunch again was a pretty lunch bag. This easy-to-sew stylish lunch bag is great for adults – I used fun fabric to make a lunch bag that I would want to remember to bring, and it didn’t take me long at all.

 I’m not an expert with a sewing machine, but luckily I didn’t need to be to make this lunch bag using two complimentary cotton fabrics. I loved the bright blue color with a minimal pattern for the outside of the bag, and the bright white fabric for the inside has a light polka dot pattern that matches well. Put together, the fabric has just enough stiffness to hold the bag together without feeling heavy or difficult to fold. Overall, the design is reminiscent of the classic brown bag but with a whole lot more color (and reusable, of course)!

MATERIALS:

  • ½ yard patterned cotton fabric*
  • ½ yard complimenting cotton fabric
  • Matching thread
  • Measuring tape
  • Rotary cutter
  • Scissors
  • Pins
  • Sewing machine
  • Iron (optional, recommended)
  • Hand sewing needle (optional)

*For simpler sewing, avoid directional patterns that require the fabric stay facing one direction

Step

Unfolded, cut both pieces of fabric into 10 in x 20 in rectangles.

DIY Easy-Sew Lunch Bag

Step

Along the 20-inch side, measure the middle. Cut out a 1 in x 3 in notch on either side, so that it looks like the above photo.

DIY Easy-Sew Lunch Bag

Step

Take the patterned piece intended to be the outside of the bag and fold in half (inside out) with the notches at the bottom. Sew along each side.

DIY Easy-Sew Lunch Bag

Step

Take the piece intended to be the inside of the bag, and fold in half (inside out) with the notches at the bottom. Sew along one side. Along the other, sew halfway, leave a 1-inch opening and sew the rest – you will need this opening for later.

Iron the seams open. This makes it less bulky later.

DIY Easy-Sew Lunch Bag

Step

Pinch the bottom notches together and sew a straight line across to square off the bottom. Repeat on each side of both pieces of fabric.

DIY Easy-Sew Lunch Bag

Step

Turn only the internal piece right side out. The outside piece should remain inside out. Both pieces should resemble bags with squared bottoms.

Step

Place the internal piece inside of the outside piece so that the patterned sides are facing each other. Sew a thin seam all the way around the top to secure the pieces together. 

DIY Easy-Sew Lunch Bag

Step

Trim excess threads and pull the entire bag right side out through the hole left in the internal piece.

Step

Using a hand sewing needle or your machine, sew the hole shut. Using your machine will not look as clean, but it is not necessary because it will be the inside lining of the bag.

DIY Easy-Sew Lunch Bag

DIY Easy-Sew Lunch Bag

Step

Push the lining into the inside of the bag and iron as needed.

To use, place items inside and simply pinch the sides and roll the top of the bag. You can certainly adjust the measurements to make a larger or smaller bag, but I found that these measurements work best for fitting everything I needed. The rolled top makes it feel like I’m carrying a much classier version of an old school brown bag lunch, and I love it!

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20 Big-Impact Accent Wall Ideas for Apartment-Dwellers

by Faith Towers
20 Big Impact Accent Wall Ideas for Apartment-Dwellers
Photo: Rain On A Tin Roof

There's nothing worse then renter-white walls. That dingy, dirty white that's not quite cream but not quite white either. But there's an easy way to fix it - add an accent wall and nobody will notice the rest of the walls! Here are twenty renter-friendly accent wall ideas that won't damage your walls (or they can be easily fixed when you move). Click through to read on.   

 

Zero Damage Accent Wall Ideas

These first few ideas will cause no damage to your apartment walls whatsoever!

 

Use paper polka dots to create an office space accent wall.
Photo:  Fellow Fellow

1. Washi Tape Polka Dots - Let's start with a crazy easy one... simply place strips of tape on waxed paper and then cut circles out of them! Get the tutorial here. [Photo:  Fellow Fellow]

 

Removable wall decals - accent wall in a child's room or nursery
Photo:  Inspired By This

2. Decal Wall - Removable wall decals are another great way to add some personality to a wall. [Photo:  Inspired By This]

 

Temporary wallpaper is a good way to create a focal wall in your home
Photo: Wallflora

3. Removable Temporary Wallpaper - This gorgeous floral wallpaper can be easily removed once you leave your rental. Buy it  here. [Photo: Wallflora]

 

Make vinyl "wallpaper" by creating a bold geometric pattern
Photo:  Cuckoo 4 Design

4. Vinyl "Wallpaper" - This person cut crosses out of black vinyl to create a bold geometric accent wall. Learn more  here. [Photo:  Cuckoo 4 Design]

 

Use metallic tape to create a feature wall
Photo: Design Fixation

5. Metallic Tape Accent Wall - There's a great product out there called metalized polyester film tape which can be stuck to the wall in any pattern your heart desires. Check out the tutorial here. [Photo: Design Fixation]

 

Geometric removable wall tiles in a bedroom
Photo: What Is Blik

6. Removable Wall Tiles - These fun geometric wall tiles are removable, so you can bring them with you to your next apartment. Check 'em out  here. [Photo: What Is Blik]

 

Fabric can be a great way to cover a wall in a space
Photo: Apartment Therapy

7. Fabric Wall Covering - Believe it or not, you can attach fabric to the wall using starch. Learn how here. [Photo: Apartment Therapy]

 

Re-Paintable Accent Wall Ideas

These accent walls will need to be painted over before you move out... so worth it though!

 

A textured ombre mural can have a huge impact in a space
Photo: Daily Dream Decor

8. Textured Mural - Give sponge painting a modern edge by creating a textured ombré accent wall. See it here. [Photo: Daily Dream Decor]

 

Paint architectural details to make them stand out, like in this model living room
Photo:  Domino

9. Painted Architectural Details - This person could have painted the whole wall black, but instead chose to be a bit more creative. Check it out  here. [Photo:  Domino

 

Stripes and patterns make this wall pop
Photo: Dream A Little Bigger

10. Layered Stripe Accent Wall Ideas - This eye-catching wall is made simply with paint and tape... so all you'll have to do is paint over it once you move! Get the tutorial  here. [Photo: Dream A Little Bigger]

 

A painted stencil on a bedroom wall above the headboard
Photo: Kristen F. Davis Designs

11. Stenciled Wall - This beautiful wall looks like wallpaper, but it's actually made with two different finishes of the same paint color (high gloss and matte). Read more  here. [Photo: Kristen F. Davis Designs]

 

Confetti gives the appearance of energy and movement on this hallway wall
Photo: Rain On A Tin Roof

12. Confetti Wall - This bold accent wall is made by taping off confetti shaped pieces and then painting within those areas. Check out the directions here. [Photo: Rain On A Tin Roof]  

 

A simple black marker can totally transform a wall, using a modern geometric pattern
Photo: Vintage Revivals

13. Sharpie Wall - Yep, this fun look was done with Sharpie markers. Head on over  here to read more about the process. [Photo: Vintage Revivals]

 

Easily Fixable Ways to Create an Accent Wall

These walls will require a bit of repair before moving out, but nothing more than patching some holes.

 

Arrange plywood in cutout shapes to make an accent wall stand out
Photo: Reality Daydream

14. Plywood Geometric Wall - If you're into woodworking, this could be a fun one for you. Simply pry the wood off when you move and fill the nail holes with spackle. Get the tutorial here. [Photo: Reality Daydream]

  

This wall uses pinned ribbons to make it a focal point in the room
Photo: BHG

15. Ribbon Wall - This one can be done by stretching ribbon in diamond shapes and securing with thumbtacks. [Photo: BHG]

 

Herringbone accent wall in a nursery
Photo:  The Caldwell Project

16. Herringbone Accent Wall - Again, this one takes a bit more effort... but it looks so beautiful! Check out the how-to here. [Photo:  The Caldwell Project]

 

Here, the home owner used corrugated metal to promote a wall behind a sofa in a living to featured status
Photo: K & Co. Antiques

17. Corrugated Metal Accent Wall - This corrugated metal is normally used for roofs, but it looks great behind the sofa here. [Photo: K & Co. Antiques]

 

Glasscloth stripes elevate this surface
Photo: Via Homedit

18. Grasscloth Striped Accent wall - Cover beams in grasscloth and nail them to the wall... so pretty! [Photo: Via Homedit]

  

Frame wallpaper to make it look like large scale wall art on a feature wall
Photo: Inspired By This

19. Framed Wallpaper - Frame up large pieces of wallpaper (or fabric, wrapping paper, etc.) and hang them on the wall. [Photo: Inspired By This]

 

Faux brick is an interesting way to add an industrial feel to a room
Photo: Design Asylum

20. Faux Brick Wall - This one takes a bit more effort, but it it looks so great once it's finished! Check out the tutorial here. [Photo: Design Asylum]

 

20 Accent Wall Ideas for Apartment-Dwellers (Big Impact, Easy to Undo)
Share this image on Pinterest! [Photo: Apartment Therapy]

 

 

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