Roundup: 12 Simple and Easy DIY Camera Straps

by Jennifer Farley

12 Simple DIY Camera Straps

My camera is always on the go, so I need a strap to keep my it safe. Here are some of my favorite do-it yourself camera straps. These DIYs are simple, unique, and most importantly, durable. Before you go out and buy one, check out this roundup of 12 camera strap tutorials.   

 

12 Simple DIY Camera Straps
Free People Blog

1. DIY No-Sew Fabric Remnant Camera Strap

This is perfect for you non-sewers, but I will admit, I would feel more comfortable with a few stitches instead of glue to secure my camera. I would use super glue instead of hot glue to keep it safe.

2. Woven Rope Camera Strap

All you need is store-bought woven rope, "D" rings, clasps, and a needle and thread. Check out the tutorial here.

3. Cotton Webbing Camera Strap

Cotton webbing is very sturdy and inexpensive. All you need to spice it up is a little paint. Check out the tutorial over on Design Love Fest.

4. Easy No-Sew DIY Leather Strap

This strap is seriously so easy. Go to your local leather store and grab a remnant of leather to cut into a strip. Get more details on this easy project here.

12 Simple DIY Camera Straps
Teva Blog

5. Braided Fabric and Leather Camera Strap

I really like this camera strap Leah Duncan made over on the Teva.com blog. Check out her project tutorial here. You can also grab some of her amazing textiles to make yours here.

6. DIY Scarf Camera Strap

There are many tutorials for this type of camera strap, but my favorite is this one from The House that Lars Built. You can check out the step by step photo tutorial here or click here for the video tutorial.

7. DIY Braided Rope Camera Strap

Almost Makes Perfect does it again with this simple braided camera strap tutorial.

8. DIY Macrame Camera Strap

Macrame is stylish and very durable making it a great option for a camera strap. Check out the project "how to" here.

9.  DIY Skinny Leather Camera Strap

This leather strap is very organic and simple. I like the durability of the grommet. Check out how Courtney from Always Rooney makes hers here.

12 Simple DIY Camera Straps
Spool and Spoon

10. Braided Jersey Fabric Camera Strap

Cut up an old t-shirt to make this light weight strap. Check out the details here.

11. DIY Vintage Belt Camera Strap

Run to your local thrift store and grab a vintage belt for this easy camera strap project. Find out all the details over on Poppy Talk.

12 Simple DIY Camera Straps
For the Love of Outdoors

12. DIY Paracord Wrist Camera Strap

To keep your camera from slipping from your hand make a paracord wrist strap. Check out the tutorial over on For the Love of Outdoors.

12 Simple DIY Camera Straps
Pin It: 12 Simple DIY Camera Straps

It's time to secure your camera in style!

Are you learning photography? Check out this short video tutorial from Curbly on how to take photos using natural light.

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6 MORE Ways to Use Your Digital Camera for DIY

by DIY Maven

6 MORE Ways to Use Your Digital Camera for DIY

Last week I posted 6 ways to use your digital camera for DIY, however, if you include the GREAT TIPS in the comments section of the post, it was more like 12 ways. With such a wonderful response, I thought I'd add a few more ways I use my digi for DIY. 

1. You can get some wonderful design ideas from public spaces such as hotels, restaurants and, yes, even bars, where proprietors are used to camera flashes. (I'm often inspired by their...

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6 Ways to Use Your Digital Camera for DIY

by DIY Maven

created on: 01/07/09

Anecdote: When MWT and I first started dating, I assisted him in changing the brakes on one of his old beaters. I've forgotten which one. It could have been 'Herb', the 1964 Chevelle handed down from his grandfather, or the '76 Nova that he bought from his family's barber, or the rusty/orange GMC 10 pickup of an unknown year affectionately referred to as 'The Unit'. Whichever it was, when the tire was off and the parts were scattered across the garage floor, we realized we didn't pay close enough attention to how we dismantled the thing. We were in quite the pickle. We decided the only way were were going to get the job done was to disassemble the opposite tire/brakes, keeping track step by step how it came apart so we could put BOTH right again. It would have been the perfect opportunity to employ a Polaroid to shoot the dismantling process. Nowadays, of course, if we find ourselves facing a similar predicament, we whip out the old digital point and shoot. 

There are other ways a digital camera can come in handy for the diy-er. Here are six tips from DIY Life that you might want to keep in mind when starting your next project:

  1. Use it as a reference tool. (As exhibited above.)
  2. Use it as a replacement part stand-in. This way you can take the pic to your local hardware store to show the folks there just what you're looking for.
  3. Use it as a periscope. Your hand + camera can get into tight spaces your head can't reach!
  4. Use it as a flashlight. If you hold down the trigger half way, the autofocus infrared signal will engage, providing you with light in emergency situations.
  5. Use it as a magnifying glass. The zoom function can get closer than you can.
  6. Use it as a label maker. Take a picture of stored items that you put in boxes and then adhere the pics to the boxes for quick and clever reference. 

Did DIY Life miss a tip? If you have one to add, please post in the comments below!

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Handmade Felt Camera Cases.

by Chris Gardner

Hine

I find these handmade camera cases by Hine to be endlessly inspirational and utterly adorable. Created with felt, buttons, and handstitching, they work just as well as art as an actual camera case. Simply lovely.

Check out Hine's handmade stop motion video about the process below. Via.

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DIY 35mm Camera

by DIY Maven

DIY 35mm Camera

Urban Outfitters SuperHeadz Plamodel DIY 35mm Camera ($28) would be a great way to see just how a camera works. Much like a model car kit, the camera comes in parts that you separate and then snap together, but unlike the scaled-down versions of cars, this kit produces a working camera--albeit without a flash. The kit includes a vinyl bag, wrist strap and screw driver. No batteries are required for opperation and it takes good old 35mm film.

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Build A DIY Panoramic Tripod Head for $10.

by Chris Gardner

Build A DIY Panoramic Tripod Head for $10.

The wealth of online stitching software should inspire any digital camera owner into creating their own panoramic photos. To ensure that these turn out as best they can, a specialty panoramic tripod head does the trick. But don't rush to the photoshop to get one for hundreds of dollars...instead, head to the hardware store with a Hamilton.

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How To: Make a Crafty Camera Strap.

by Chris Gardner

How To: Make a Crafty Camera Strap.

That black and yellow Nikon strap that my wife insists must stay attached to our DSLR is the most uninspiring, and perhaps downright embarassing, photo ecoutrement I can imagine.

Now THIS, on the other hand, makes me want to shoot the entire world.

Materials

  • Fabric of your choice
  • Some paper
  • A pen
  • Scissors
  • Sewing machine and thread

Simply use your old strap to make a pattern, cut and sew, and slip your old strap in...

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8 Free Photography eBooks

by Chris Gardner

Knowing is half the battle...and not paying for it is the other half. Be sure to peep thess FREE e-books on one of Curbly's fave media, photography. These ain't no one page folded booklet pdfs, these are BOOKS, and they're FREE, and they're GOOD.

1. Tinker Tubes - Personal Lighting Systems by Dean Collins

2. Lighting 101 by David Hobby

3. JPG Magazine by 8020 Publishing

4. The Image-Space Tips and Tricks collection by Joe Barrett

5. Wedding...

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Print Your Own Free Pinhole Cameras.

by Chris Gardner

"Pinhole cameras use a tiny hole instead of a lens to cast an often unpredictable image onto film. They're relatively simple to build, which makes them ideal DIY projects. To help you out, stock photo agency Corbis has commissioned a series of fanciful pinhole camera designs. Each camera comes as a pdf download that includes instructions to turn a simple sheet of paper into a real camera."

Print Your Own Free Pinhole Cameras.

Materials

  • Cereal box or other lightweight...

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How to Make a DIY Camera Stand

by Chris Gardner

Tripods can shoot just about every angle but one: straight down. Its very design demands that the legs will get in the way. Attaching the tripod to the ceiling or the camera to a boom stand is an option, but the thought of dangling a camera in such a way is frightening. Plus, if you’d like to use the camera for animation, keeping the camera still is essential. Professional camera stands are great, but are quite expensive.

How to Make a DIY Camera Stand

So, here goes: A DIY downshoot stand for still and macro photography and animation, that keeps the camera in a single and safe position. Cost: around $20.

Materials:
•  1/2” threaded galvanized piping
    o   3 x 24” lengths (if you work with very small objects, you might use one 24” and two 18” or even 12”                     lengths)
    o    2 x 90-degree elbows
    o    2 x end flanges
•    1 x ¼” bolt, 2” length
•    Several ¼” washers
•    Steel mending plate
•    Small rectangle of hardwood or MDF, slightly bigger than plate
•    Soft, sturdy material, such as felt and non-stick shelf lining
•    #10 (or other thin, long) bolts and nuts and washers, 2” length
•    2 x 24” lengths of 2 x 4” lumber
•    8 x 1 ½” wood screws
•    Electric drill and drill bits
•    Plumber’s epoxy
•    Velcro strips

1). First, we need to create a base plate that attaches to the threaded tripod hole and support the camera. Attach the mending plate to the larger rectangle of hardwood with the included screws. Then, drill a ¼” hole through the center of both pieces, using a slower speed when drilling through the metal.

2). Next, drill two 3/16th holes on either side of the center hole. Drill two matching holes in the center of one of the 24” pipe pieces, then attach the plate to the pipe with #10 bolts, nuts, and washers. Then, using the ¼” hole in the plate as a guide, drill a ¼” hole through the pipe.

3). Then, thread it into your camera, and note how much extra room there is. Take the camera off, and then tighten this gap with the appropriate amount of washers. Next, squish together some plumbers epoxy (the doughy stuff in the tube), and apply to all touching metal parts- the bolt, in between the washers, the pipe, etc. The goal is to prevent the bolt from spinning, since we can’t use a nut.


4). Once the epoxy has dried, we need to protect the camera from the hardware. I glued on a piece of wool felt, and then a layer of non-stick shelf lining. Of course, it’s necessary to cut a hole to accommodate the ¼” bolt.


5). Attach the 90-degree elbows to the pipe with the bracket, and then screw on a pipe to each end. Arrange the pipes so you have a flat (upside down) u-shape, with the sides perpendicular to the top bar, and the support plate faces outward.

6). Twist the flanges onto the ends, and place them onto the 2 x 4”s, about 9 inches from the back. Attach the flanges to the wood with 1 ½” screws.

7). Attach the camera, and then cut two strips of Velcro (use the all-in-one kind, with the integrated hooks and loops), and wrap them around the camera to support the weight. Stay clear of any controls.


8). To use, simply clamp the 2x4”s to a flat surface. Use the side bars to support any extra lights, etc.

My thoughts: I took a time lapse overnight, and noticed no movement in the camera. Sweet. I also realize the height isn't adjustable (yet), but I find I can do anything I want with the zoom on the camera lens. I can fill up the frame with a #10 bolt, which is good enough for me.

Cheers.

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Awesome DIY Projects from Recycled Disposable Cameras.

by Chris Gardner

Photo labs have boxes of disposable cameras, waiting to be recycled. If you ask nicely, and they'll share them by the dozens. Check out the ideas below for some clever and amazing projects for the sake of art and recycling.

  • Create a Ring Flash: This Instructable shows you how to make a DIY ring flash from six disposable camera flashes and a couple metal bowls. The project requires a bit of electronics knowledge, but the results look awesome.
  • ...

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How to Turn Disposable Cameras into Permanent Ones

by DIY Maven

How to Turn Disposable Cameras into Permanent Ones

Hey, sometimes it happens. You forget your camera or camcorder at home and you just need to capture something on film, so you find the nearest drug store and spend way too much money on a single-use camera, which you really don’t want to do because it’s a one use camera and you have a perfectly good–really good, actually–camera at home that you researched endlessly on the internet and spent a bundle on! Well, here’s a couple of hacks which will...

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Gots to Getcha a GorillaPod.

by Chris Gardner

Imagine this: 

You're about to complete the ultimate Curbly How-To DIY post, and you think, "Man! Wouldn't it be sweet if I could hang my camera from the ceiling, and take a photo of me actually working on it?!"

Or, you're planning to scale Mt. Rainier, and you know you'll want a photo of you and your backpacking buddies, but there's no way you're gonna lug a tripod in your pack for 14,410 feet.

Or, if you're not totally allergic to all things furry...

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