A Very Surprising Kitchen Makeover

by DIY Maven
A Very Surprising Kitchen Makeover
Photo: Aston Design Studio

Hate oak cabinetry? Most people these days seem to, or feel that they are expected to hate it. However, the people who own the kitchen pictured above didn't and weren't afraid to admit their preference. They liked oak's "refined rustic/craftsman style." So, when it came time to  makeover the space, they were determined to keep it. At least some of it. To make it less overwhelming, the oak flooring was removed and replaced with something much more durable: slate (head over to The Home Depot for some great options of your own). Then, to add contrast, dark green cabinets, matching the style of the old cabinets, were added to the space. This is the what the kitchen looks like now:

Photo: Aston Design Studio

For more pictures and information concerning the makeover, please visit Aston Design Studio. 

And if you're not so into oak kitchen cabinetry, check out our step-by-step guide to painting them!

How to paint kitchen cabinetry - a step by step guide

What do do with Oak Cabinets [Aston Design Studio]

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Unbelievable $125 Laundry Room Makeover

by DIY Maven
Unbelievable $125 Laundry Room Makeover
Photo: View Along the Way

Kelly's washer and dryer looked kinda sad in their old living quarters. Did she paint them with a bright color to cheer them up? Nope. She just changed everything around them to make them look like a million bucks--and it only cost $125! From top to bottom--including an amazing DIY pendant light to painting the vinyl flooring--nothing

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Roundup: 10 Common Items You Should Always Consider Buying at Estate Sales

by Jennifer Farley
Estate Sale Finds

I love vintage furniture but it can be expensive unless you know where to look. In the search of items for my home, I am more likely to stop at an estate sale than a garage sale or thrift store. I have found the "finds" at an estate sale to be more consistent. If you are wanting to find some interesting decor and stylish vintage pieces make a stop at a local estate sale. Here are 10 common things you will more than likely find there.   

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Curbly Original
Make It: DIY Ikea Stockholm-Inspired Rug Using Carpet Tiles

by Jennifer Farley
Carpet Tile Rug

I have always really loved the Ikea Stockholm rug.  I know, so does everyone, but there is a reason why.  It is a classic and it can fit in any type of room.   My guest bedroom needed the 8x10 size but I wanted the 5X7 price or cheaper. I randomly saw an advertisement for my local carpet warehouse saying they had carpet tile for $1.25 a sq/ft.  What?  I decided to check it out the next day and found materials to make this knock-off Ikea Stockholm rug.

 Did you know most local carpet warehouses carry commercial grade-B carpet tiles?  Well, I didn't...but I do now.  Who knew what you could find if you looked past the massive rolls and rolls of discount carpet.  While I dream of ordering a carpet tile rug from Flor, their carpet tile rugs can get expensive fast. In comparison, the commercial grade tiles were 24x24 inch rubber-backed tiles for $3.50 a tile.  This is pennies compared to $14+ of the higher-end version.  These commercial grade tiles were thicker and softer to walk on than a flat weave rug. The employees showed me a rug in their break room that was well trafficked and I was sold on the durability.  That day I realized I could make my Stockholm dreams come true for around $100.  Here is what I needed:

Materials:

  • For an 8 x 10 rug I needed twenty 24 x 24in. tiles.  I bought a few extra of each color just in case.
  • A box cutting knife with extra blades.
  • A straight edge.  I  grabbed a 6 x 24in. wood-look tile from Lowes.  It was sturdy, straight and was only $2.  Since the tile was 6 inches wide, I could make three cuts (4 pieces) out of one tile without measuring.  Less work = awesome.
  • A couple of old boxes for cutting surface protection.
  • Gorilla Tape (or you could use Duck tape)

Step-by-Step:

Carpet Tile Rug

 1.  Place your tiles face down on a solid surface.  Use a broken-down box (or two) to protect the surface.

Carpet Tile Rug

 

2.  The "pile" of a carpet tile is manufactured in little rows. You want to make sure you cut perpendicular to the rows of pile.  This is an important step because if you cut the carpet tile parallel to the rows, your carpet pile will pull apart.   This will result in bare spots on the edges of your cut tile.  If you cut perpendicular to the rows of carpet pile, the cut tile will stay together without pulls or bare spots.  

3. Place your straight edge on the back of the carpet tile, perpendicular to the rows of carpet pile, and hold it down firmly. I did this on the floor so I used my knee, my hand, and my body weight.  

4. Using the guide to make a straight cut, start at the top.  Score the rubber backing with one full swipe.  Don't stop in the middle.

5. Without moving the straight-edge guide, cut the tile by starting on the edge and going from top to bottom through the score.  Don't stop in the middle of the cut.  If your blade is sharp this will be the only cut you do.  If you need to, fold the tile at the cut and gently cut the areas of rubber that are still attached.  If this happens you might need some scissors to trim up the edge of the carpet.  Again, this will be avoided if the blade is sharp.  Change your blade every 5-6 cuts.  I would encourage you to buy a extra tile for the purpose of making practice cuts.  This allows you to give yourself grace, know how long your blade stays sharp, and the opportunity to learn from your mistakes. It took me about 3 cuts to get in my groove, which was only one tile.

Carpet Tile Rug

6. When you are all done you will have 80 (or more with extras) of 6 x 24in. carpet tiles. The cutting process took me about 2.5 hours including some much needed back breaks.

7.  To put the rug together, first move any furniture out of the way.  It is better to build the rug in place rather than to try to move it.

Carpet Tile Rug

8.  Attach four carpet tiles where they meet at the corners with a piece of Gorilla Tape.  I think I went overboard with the Gorilla tape.  With every connection you make, the rubber-backed rug gets stronger and immovable.  Duck Tape should work just fine.  You could also order these Dots from Flor.

Carpet Tile Rug

9. To strengthen the edges of the rug, I connected the end pieces together at the edge.  

Here is how it turned out:

Carpet Tile Rug

I love it for so many reasons.  The biggest reason was the price.  The white tile was actually on sale. I paid $80.00 for the tiles (including extras), and $25.00 for supplies.  This 8 x 10 rug was a total of $105!  The inspiration version is $299.00.  I also saved a little extra money because I didn't need a rug pad.  

Carpet Tile Rug

 I am always hesitant to DIY rugs because of the amount of effort and the lack of durability.  Cutting is the longest part of this rug DIY but its not tedious or too time consuming.  After almost a year of use, I can truly say this rug is durable.  It is also interchangeable.  If a tile is dirty I can take it out and clean it.  I also kept the extras so I could switch out a tile if it gets ruined.  I can even switch out a highly trafficked tile with one hidden underneath the furniture. Finally, this rug is not plush but it is more soft than it's flat weave store-bought version.

carpet tile rug

Not up for cutting tile?  Using the same tiles, I could have easily...in less than an hour...installed a black and white rug striped rug like this one without one cut.  If they don't have black and white, other options are tone-on-tone stripes or borders.  Go check and see if your local carpet outlet or warehouse has some tiles in stock.  On another note, If you are reading this post I am guessing you are considering DIYing a rug? If so, check out this post and this post from Curbly. 

 

 

 

 

 

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Before and After: $19k Budget Kitchen Remodel

by DIY Maven
Before and After: $19k Budget Kitchen Remodel
Photo: Design Edge

Nineteen thousand dollars doesn't go far when you hire someone else to do the work. That's why this kitchen makeover is considered a budget job. When the owners of the kitchen went to Design Edge, they had a check list that included replacing the cabinets, buying new  appliances, installing a new countertop, adding a backsplash, adding new light fixtures and a hardwood floor. They got it all--including granite countertops.

Photo: Design Edge

Will stainless steel appliances come along in the future? Who knows, but for now the fresh white pieces suit the space just fine. 

Caption

For more pictures of the makeover, visit this page on Porch. 

White Residence [Porch]

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Curbly Original
Curbly Headquarters Grows Up: Our New Office and Studio Space

by Alicia Lacy
The Curbly HQ makeover is done. Here's the tour!

Working from home is the greatest thing in the world, except when it's not. Our little Curbly unit had a great thing going for a long time, but then Bruno and I had children, and they made working from home more like working-in-10-minute-increments-from-home-all-the-live-long-day.

So, we found a little space a few blocks from our house and set out to make it our own. It has been an adventure and we've been going full tilt for the last six weeks. The space is complete and we're excited to share it with you - come have a look!

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Unnecessarily Necessarily Tuscan Kitchen Makeover

by DIY Maven
Unnecessarily Necessarily Tuscan Kitchen Makeover
Photo: Becki Owens

This makeover might be a head-scratcher for some. I mean, there wasn't anything necessarily wrong with the kitchen "before." And, as a matter of fact, I'm sure it was some peoples' idea of a dream kitchen. It wasn't, however, its owners' idea of a dream kitchen. With the help of designer Becki Owens, they ditched the Tuscan vibe completely. Professionally sprayed

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