Curbly Original
IKEA Hack: Clever Hanging Planter Basket Set

by Faith Towers
IKEA Hack: Clever Hanging Planter Basket Set
Photo: Faith Towers

I'm a plant lover through and through. Plants add visual interest to a space, and they clean the air too. So when I saw the Fryken baskets at IKEA, I knew I had to turn them into a hanging planter set. Not only does it look cool, but it also keeps the plants away from the curious nose of my mischievous dog. So read on find out how you can make your own hanging planter basket set.   

 

IKEA Hack: Clever Hanging Planter Basket Set
Photo: Faith Towers

The final product is a nice combination of rustic and contemporary, with the bright colored cord paired with the natural sea grass. And it's surprisingly easy to make! Let's get started.

 

IKEA Hack: Clever Hanging Planter Basket Set
Photo: Faith Towers

Here's what you'll need for your planter:

 

  • IKEA Fryken basket set
  • Acrylic craft paint
  • Foam paint brush
  • 10' of parachute cord
  • Scissors
  • Embroidery needle
  • 4" piece of thin wire (not pictured)
IKEA Hack: Clever Hanging Planter Basket Set
Photo: Faith Towers

Begin by painting the bottom of each basket. I mixed up a dark turquoise color, and painted on an angle so that the color would be visible from the side when the baskets were hanging.

 

IKEA Hack: Clever Hanging Planter Basket Set
Photo: Faith Towers

Here's a look at the side of the basket. Feel free to use a piece of painters tape to help create a straight line. Let the baskets dry thoroughly.

 

IKEA Hack: Clever Hanging Planter Basket Set
Photo: Faith Towers

Now it's time to connect the baskets using parachute cord. You can buy the cord on Amazon or at most craft stores (I bought mine at Michaels). You most likely won't be able to thread your cord through the embroidery needle, so you'll need to fashion a little loop out of wire. To do this, thread the wire through the needle, create a 1 inch opening and then twist the ends together as shown above.

 

IKEA Hack: Clever Hanging Planter Basket Set
Photo: Faith Towers

Cut 6 pieces of parachute cord that are 12 inches long each. Thread one piece of cord through your wire loop and push the needle through the top of the largest basket, as shown above. If you have trouble getting the cord through, pull everything back out and use a flat head screwdriver to gently wiggle a small hole in that spot and then try threading it through again.

 

IKEA Hack: Clever Hanging Planter Basket Set
Photo: Faith Towers

Once it comes through, pull one end all the way through and tie a knot at the end. Then pull the outside end back out so the knot is positioned on the inside of the basket. Do this for three of the pieces of cord, evenly spacing them around the top of the basket.

 

IKEA Hack: Clever Hanging Planter Basket Set
Photo: Faith Towers

Next, use the same process to pull the top of one of the cords through the bottom of the medium sized basket. Tie a knot at the top of that cord. Do the same for the other two cords. 

Now repeat the exact same process for the medium basket and attach it to the smallest basket. Adjust the knots slightly if the baskets aren't sitting flat.

 

IKEA Hack: Clever Hanging Planter Basket Set
Photo: Faith Towers

Then cut three pieces of cord that are 15 inches long each, and attach those to the top of the smallest basket. Knot the three pieces together at the top as shown above, and hang it from a hook. Your planter set is finished!

 

IKEA Hack: Clever Hanging Planter Basket Set
Photo: Faith Towers

You'll want to use plants that are already in plastic containers so you can take them out to water them... if the sea grass baskets get wet repeatedly, they may start to get a bit moldy. For the bottom basket, I used cuttings from another Pothos plant and put them in a plastic container that I found in my recycling bin. I did the same for the Jade plant in the middle, and the top one is an air plant - so no soil needed!

 

IKEA Hack: Clever Hanging Planter Basket Set
Photo: Faith Towers

You can customize these to your liking, using colors that match your decor - or you might even consider using different colors for each section if you like a multi-color look.

 

IKEA Hack: Clever Hanging Planter Basket Set
Photo: Faith Towers

You could fill the entire thing with air plants, for a lower maintenance option. Just don't forget to water them like I did last time! Spritz them thoroughly in the sink every week or two to keep them looking good.

 

IKEA Hack: Clever Hanging Planter Basket Set
Photo: Faith Towers

If you try this project, feel free to share a link to it in the comments section below. Happy crafting everyone!

 

IKEA Hack: Clever Hanging Planter Basket Set
Share this post on Pinterest! [Photo: Faith Towers]

 

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Curbly Original
How to: Repurpose an Old Drying Rack into a Stylish Magazine Rack

by Jennifer Farley

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

I love to read magazine and so does my family. Long live the paper subscription! So, I wanted magazine storage for our living room to keep them all in one place. So, let's get to it: how to make a simple and stylish wood and leather magazine rack. 

 First the research: I am really drawn leather and brass/gold magazine racks like this one.

DIY Leather Luggage Rack
AEMCateer.com

I was originally going to attempt this with a vintage folding tray table but realized quickly a folding tray table is too tall for magazine rack. My second thought was a luggage rack, but they also weren't the right height or width.

But then! I pulled into a garage sale and found the below clothes drying rack and thought, hmm.... this thing actually might work.

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

The funny thing is this drying rack (I think) is the cheapest one you can by at a discount store. I got lucky with a garage sale price but I will link to a new option in the materials list.

materials

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

Here is what you need:

  • Wooden clothes drying rack. Here is a great one from Amazon
  • leather, vinyl, or upholstery fabric. I chose this faux leather from Joann's
  • hot glue gun or sewing machine
  • gold spray paint
  • hand saw or multi tool
  • chain or string
  • cutting pliers (optional)
  • thumbtacks
  • scissors (not pictured)
  • ruler 

Step

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

Take apart your drying rack and set the aside the dowels. Now, we need to cut it up. There are many ways to do this, but through trial and error (and a few mistakes) this is how I did it:

The bottom half of the rack would become the side pieces of the rack. It is hard to tell in pictures but we cut underneath the grommet at a 90 degree angle. To truly get a 90 degree angle we needed a little more freedom of movement from the accordion rack. To get this we FIRST cut the rack where you see the pink Xs. 

Step

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

After you have made the cuts to give the rack freedom you can adjust the piece of wood you are cutting of to make a nice clean 90 degree cut under the grommet. Cut one side, then flip it over and cut the other side.

 I originally tried to keep the grommets since the dowel rods where made to fit in them, but it was hard because the grommets went through both pieces of wood. The dowel rods are made to be smaller where they are to be inserted. I decided I could drill holes in faster time than to figure out how to remove/cut the grommet and sand down the freshly cut dowel rods to fit.

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

Here is what one side should look like when it is cut. You will need two of these. The middle grommet is your connecting point. Since we cut of the top grommets the distance from the grommet to the end of the wood is not the same on this side. This was actually better for the structure of the magazine rack. Use the longer side to be the base of the magazine rack and the shorter side to be the top. This will allow the leather/fabric of the magazine rack to hang down a little more.

Step

Repeat Steps 1-2 on the opposite side of the drying rack. Make sure both sides are the same length.

Step

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

You now have two Xs which are the two sides of your magazine rack. Drill holes in each end of one side of the magazine rack. To make sure they match, stack them and drill both at the same time.  Then lay the side with drilled holes on top of the side with no holes and mark where the holes should be drilled (not pictured). Drill the holes on the second side of the magazine rack.  It is important to measure well so your dowel rods will be level when inserted.

Step

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

Now it is time to measure the dowel rods. I used a magazine to estimate my length. I wanted it to be a bit larger than the magazine just in case I wanted to store big coffee table books as well. 

The length is up to you, but I wanted my magazine rack (the exposed part) to be 17 inches wide. In measuring, I had to take into consideration that I would cut off the sanded ends.  I cut off the grommets in Step 2 so I needed both sides of the dowel to be the same thickness. Before measured, I cut these off. (not pictured)

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

Your two dowel rods will be different lengths due to one being inserted into the inside of the rack and one being inserted into the outside of the rack. I wanted my dowel rods to be inserted all the way through the wood to be flush with the outside of the rack. The depth of my wood was 1/4 inch. The bottom dowel was easy. I needed to cut the dowel 17.5 inches.

The top dowel had to be 1 inch longer because it had to extend the length of two of the .25 inch deep pieces on each side totaling .5 inches more on each side.  I cut it 18 inches. [17inches + .5 + .5 = 18 inches]

Summary: Whatever your measurement cut one dowel 1/2 inch longer than the other.

 

Step

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

Cut your dowel rods. The picture shows me cutting three rods, but I learned later that you only need to cut two. Use a clamp to tighten them down. I used my multi-tool to cut them down. You could use a hacksaw or chop saw.

Step

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

 

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

 

To keep the magazine rack from closing you need to secure the sides. I used my snippers to cut an old necklace I had.

Step

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

 

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

 

I used thumb tacks to secure the chain. Any chain would work or you could also use a small strip of your leather/fabric or string.

To make sure each side opens the same measure where you place the thumb tacks from the grommet.

Step

 

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

 

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

 

Insert your dowel rods and secure them with glue. I squeezed a little hot glue in the hole before I inserted the dowel rod. 

I added thumbtacks to the outside of my rack where the dowel was showing to get it a more finished look.

Step

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

Spray paint your magazine rack.

Note: You can spray paint your parts separately and install the finished rack after the leather/fabric part is sewn.

Step

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

Now, it is time to cut your leather.  I couldn't find a large enough piece of cognac leather in the remnant pile at our local leather store so I chose to use vinyl faux leather in a caramel color. I am always amazed at how far vinyl has come in looking like leather. I found mine at Joann Fabric.

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

Cut the fabric into two pieces. I noticed my inspiration piece had the finished side of the leather on both sides of the magazine rack. If you are using real leather this step is optional. You might like the look of your magazine rack to have the softer side of the leather on the inside. If you want the finished side seen on the outside and inside then cut two pieces. I had to use two pieces because the unfinished side of faux leather is not pretty. Your measurements will depend on the size of your magazine rack. Here are the sizes of the two pieces I cut.

The exposed part of my inserted dowel is 17 inches. I wanted the dowel to have 1/4 inch on each side of exposed dowel. The smaller piece will be cut the exact width of the finished product. You will fold the sizes of the larger piece over this smaller piece.

Step

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

Place the the two "wrong sides" of the fabric/leather together. Place the smaller piece in the middle. There should be two inches of leather to fold on the top and the bottom. There should be one inch to fold on each side.

Step

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

 

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

 

Fold the sides in 1/2 inch and sew or glue.

For these next steps you can sew or you can use glue. If you are going to put heavy books in the rack I would suggest sewing. Mine will only hold 3-5 magazines and hot glue/super glue is sturdy enough for this.

Step

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

Fold the folded side another 1/2 inch to finish off the sides.

Step

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

Take the top and fold the top side over the dowel rod and glue. I made sure I cut straight lines on my vinyl so I didn't have to fold over twice on the top.

Note: If you have not assembled your magazine rack then this would be where you would place the fabric on the dowel rods and assemble your stand.

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

You are done! All you need are some magazines.

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

 

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

 

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

The magazine rack is quite sturdy and can hold more magazines than shown.

DIY Leather Magazine Rack

I love how this little project turned out. Who knew it came from an old drying rack!

DIY Leather Magazine Rack
Pin It: DIY Faux Leather Magazine Rack

 

I love a good repurpose. The drying rack has enough parts to make a couple of these, so I think I'll do a few more!

 

Want another fun DIY project? Check out his adorable kitchen utensil wall art here on Curbly.

 

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Curbly Original
IKEA Hack: Make a Spinning Tiered Serving Tray

by Faith Towers
IKEA Hack: Spinning Tiered Serving Tray
Photo: Faith Towers

We love a good IKEA hack around here, and today we have something extra special for you - a double IKEA hack! This tiered serving tray spins, so guests can easily reach that brie that they're so desperate to eat. It uses up less surface area on the table too, by taking advantage of vertical space. Click through to check out the full tutorial.   

 

IKEA Hack: Spinning Tiered Serving Tray
Photo: Faith Towers

Fun, right? You can customize the colors too. So let's get started!

IKEA Hack: Spinning Tiered Serving Tray
Photo: Faith Towers

Here's what you'll need for your spinning tiered serving tray:

 

  • IKEA Snudda
  • IKEA Vildapel (you won't need the accompanying casters)
  • (2) 1" diameter dowel rods, 4.5" long each
  • Acrylic craft paints
  • Paintbrush
  • Wood Glue
IKEA Hack: Spinning Tiered Serving Tray
Photo: Faith Towers

Begin by painting the dowel rods your desired color. You may need two coats - let the first coat dry thoroughly before starting the second one.

IKEA Hack: Spinning Tiered Serving Tray
Photo: Faith Towers

Next, find the center of the IKEA Snudda Lazy Susan. Place a dollop of wood glue there and place the bottom dowel rod in the glue. Let it dry for a couple of hours so it is secure. Then, find the center of the underside of the Vilapel and glue that to the top of that same dowel rod.

IKEA Hack: Spinning Tiered Serving Tray
Photo: Faith Towers

Next, find the center of the top of the Vilapel and glue the top dowel rod to it. Let everything dry overnight. And that's it! One of the easiest double IKEA hacks ever.

IKEA Hack: Spinning Tiered Serving Tray
Photo: Faith Towers

A note: I wouldn't recommend putting a big heavy bowl of salsa on the top tier of this serving tray - stick to lighter items just to be safe.

IKEA Hack: Spinning Tiered Serving Tray
Photo: Faith Towers

You can get creative with the colors too - metallic might be fun, or even a colorful pattern. Have fun with it!

IKEA Hack: Spinning Tiered Serving Tray
Share this project on Pinterest! [Photo: Faith Towers]

 

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Curbly Original
Make It: DIY Metallic Geometric Planters in 5 Minutes

by Brittni Mehlhoff

Make It: DIY Metallic Geometric Planters in 5 Minutes

 

Save money on expensive pots and planters with this quick and easy project that will conceal any ugly plastic container in about five minutes, for less than $1 a piece.   

Using some leftover contact paper, you can whip up some faux metal containers to hide the ugly plastic ones your store-bought houseplants came in. 

Materials
  • Scrap Cardboard
  • Copper Contact Paper
  • Small Plants or succulents
Tools
  • Scis...

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Curbly Original
4 Home Decor DIYs Salvaged from the Recycling Bin

by Faith Towers
4 Home Decor DIYs Salvaged from the Recycling Bin
Photo: Faith Towers

I've been making a concerted effort lately to remember to recycle as much as possible, and it's been working... we have double the amount of recycling as we do trash lately. And then I got to thinking - there must be all kinds of fun DIYs that I could do using all those empty vessels. Keep reading to check out four easy ones that I tried out.   

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How To: 'Dye' Clear Glass Any Color (We Test Two Techniques)

by DIY Maven

 

Looking for a way to create colored glass bottles and mason jars? Why tested two techniques to see which one works best. 

Colored glass bottles
Photo: DIY Maven

 

A few years back, we profiled a new technique to 'dye' clear glass any color. The original maker included instructions that called for mixing acetone (nail polish remover) with Vitrail glass paint. Since posting the profile of the technique, the original how-to has vanished from the internets. We decided to take our own stab at the technique to see if we could replicate the outcome and devise our own how-to.

With some trial and error, we were able to do it...but not without some surprises. 


Before we begin, let's talk about those surprises. The original materials list consisted of clear jars, acetone, and Vitrail glass paint. We tried that glass coloring technique – and we'll reveal the results. However, another option for dying clear glass is using Vitrail Lightening Medium instead of acetone. In the material list listed below, we've included both acetone and the lightening medium. You can decide, after seeing the effect, which you'd rather use to dye glass:

MATERIALS

  • Clear glass mason jars or bottles to paint
  • Plastic straws
  • Vitrail glass paint
  • Acetone (nail polish remover)
  • Vitrail Lightening Medium 
Dying glass supplies
Photo: DIY Maven

Step

 

adding Vitrail to jar
Photo: DIY Maven

We'll start with the original technique, which utilized acetone.

To begin, make sure your jar is completely clean and dry, both inside and outside. Shake the Vitrail paint to mix well. Dip a plastic straw into the paint and dribble paint inside the jar so it touches only the bottom--NOT the sides of the jar. (The amount of paint you put inside the jar will depend upon the size of the jar, of course, but it's better to error on the side of a little too much than too little.)

Step

 

adding acetone to jar
Photo: DIY Maven

Using another clean straw, draw up some acetone using the finger-over-the-end-of-the-straw trick. Put in about 1/2 as much acetone as paint. Again, ONLY put the acetone at the very bottom of the jar--not on the sides of the jar.

 

Don't forget to read Curbly's Bottle Cutter Shoot-Out to find the perfect cutter for your painted bottles and jars!

bottle cutter review

 

Looking for more great ideas? We like this book:

Step

Mixing acetone and paint
Photo: DIY Maven

 

Use another straw to mix the acetone and paint. Mix it WELL. 

Step

 

swirling the acetone and paint
Photo: DIY Maven

When the paint and acetone are completely mixed, rotate the jar on its side to swirl the paint, thereby painting the inside of the jar. 

First surprise. Acetone does NOT mix with the Vitrail. Now, although this was a complete fail, the outcome is really cool. It looks kind of like a static lava lamp.


Now let's try the other technique, this time using the Vitrail Lightening Medium.

Step

adding Vitrail to jar
Photo: DIY Maven

 

 

Again, make sure your jar is completely clean and dry inside. Shake the Vitrail paint to mix well. Dip a plastic straw into the paint and dribble inside the jar so it touches only the bottom--NOT the sides--of the jar. (To repeate: the amount of paint you put inside the jar will depend upon the size of the jar, but it's better to error on the side of a little too much than too little.)

Step

Vitrail Lightening Medium close up
Photo: DIY Maven

Using another clean straw, dribble lightening medium into the paint. Remember, ONLY put the lightening medium at the very bottom of the jar--not on the sides of the jar.

adding Vitrail Lightening Medium
Photo: DIY Maven
Using the finger-over-the-end-of-the-straw trick works for the lightening medium as well. 

Step

Mixing paint and medium
Photo: DIY Maven

 

Use a straw to mix the lightening medium and paint. Mix it WELL. 

Step

 

Rotating Vitrail and Lightening Medium mix
Photo: DIY Maven

 

When the paint and lightening medium are properly mixed, rotate the jar on its side to swirl the paint, thereby painting the inside of the jar. As you can see from the picture, the lightening medium and paint mix perfectly, as expected. (They are meant to mix after all.) The mixture is much more viscous than the paint/acetone mix, which means the paint will flow slowly, meaning you'll have to rotate slowly to coat the entire inside of the jar.

Step

Jar on straws
Photo: DIY Maven

 

When the jar is completely coated with paint, prop it up on a couple of straws so the paint will drip out of the jar completely and help it dry faster. 


Colored Glass Techniques - Results

Now let's do a side-by-side comparison of the techniques. Acetone technique is on the left and lightening medium technique is on the right. Notice the mottled effect of the of the paint/lightening medium? It's cool, but it's a far cry from the liquid-y finish of the original post. (How the maker achieved the effect, I have no clue. Mineral spirits, maybe? That will require further investigation best saved for a future how-to.) 

jar comparison
Photo: DIY Maven

 

OKAY, now for the final test. The original tutorial claimed the Vitrail and acetone combo was waterproof. Sadly, it is not. After letting a jar dry for 48 hours, I poured water into it and let it sit for about an hour--a much shorter time than you'd keep flowers in a vase. 

When I poured out the water, this is what happened:

ruined jar after subjecting it to water
Photo: DIY Maven

 

Oops. Now, before we dismiss the fixative property of Vitrail, keep in mind that Vitrail glass paint is WATER-RESISTANT, which, technically speaking, means it's "able to resist the penetration of water to some degree but not entirely."  That means NO jars that are painted on the INSIDE with either of these techniques using Vitrail glass paint can be used as vases. Sorry folks. 

That being said, they'd be lovely for candle holders or simply objets d'art.

Vitrail Glass Paint + Vitrail Lightening Medium=

Vitrail Glass Paint + Lightening Medium
Photo: DIY Maven

 

Vitrail Glass Paint + Acetone=

Vitrail Glass Paint + Acetone
Photo: DIY Maven
How to Dye Glass Pinterest Image
Photo: DIY Maven

So there it is. Although we've busted a few myths, we still love the options both these techniques provide. (My favorite...the groovy lava lamp effect!)

 

 

 

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Curbly Original
How to: Make a Simple Spring Candleholder (Using Free Materials!)

by Lidy Dipert

 

How to: Make a Simple Spring Candleholder

I'm always on the hunt for fresh tabletop decor. With spring around the corner, I'm looking for something unique and elegant, and I'm ready to bring the outdoors in. This simple spring candleholder combines all sorts of fun elements like fresh greenery and upcycled glass. I played around with different design options to add a bit more personality to each candle. It's so easy, you can make a few in no time to spruce up your home for any...

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20 Big-Impact Accent Wall Ideas for Apartment-Dwellers

by Faith Towers
20 Big Impact Accent Wall Ideas for Apartment-Dwellers
Photo: Rain On A Tin Roof

There's nothing worse then renter-white walls. That dingy, dirty white that's not quite cream but not quite white either. But there's an easy way to fix it - add an accent wall and nobody will notice the rest of the walls! Here are twenty renter-friendly accent wall ideas that won't damage your walls (or they can be easily fixed when you move). Click through to read on.   

 

Zero Damage Accent Wall Ideas

These first few ideas will cause no damage to your apartment walls whatsoever!

 

Use paper polka dots to create an office space accent wall.
Photo:  Fellow Fellow

1. Washi Tape Polka Dots - Let's start with a crazy easy one... simply place strips of tape on waxed paper and then cut circles out of them! Get the tutorial here. [Photo:  Fellow Fellow]

 

Removable wall decals - accent wall in a child's room or nursery
Photo:  Inspired By This

2. Decal Wall - Removable wall decals are another great way to add some personality to a wall. [Photo:  Inspired By This]

 

Temporary wallpaper is a good way to create a focal wall in your home
Photo: Wallflora

3. Removable Temporary Wallpaper - This gorgeous floral wallpaper can be easily removed once you leave your rental. Buy it  here. [Photo: Wallflora]

 

Make vinyl "wallpaper" by creating a bold geometric pattern
Photo:  Cuckoo 4 Design

4. Vinyl "Wallpaper" - This person cut crosses out of black vinyl to create a bold geometric accent wall. Learn more  here. [Photo:  Cuckoo 4 Design]

 

Use metallic tape to create a feature wall
Photo: Design Fixation

5. Metallic Tape Accent Wall - There's a great product out there called metalized polyester film tape which can be stuck to the wall in any pattern your heart desires. Check out the tutorial here. [Photo: Design Fixation]

 

Geometric removable wall tiles in a bedroom
Photo: What Is Blik

6. Removable Wall Tiles - These fun geometric wall tiles are removable, so you can bring them with you to your next apartment. Check 'em out  here. [Photo: What Is Blik]

 

Fabric can be a great way to cover a wall in a space
Photo: Apartment Therapy

7. Fabric Wall Covering - Believe it or not, you can attach fabric to the wall using starch. Learn how here. [Photo: Apartment Therapy]

 

Re-Paintable Accent Wall Ideas

These accent walls will need to be painted over before you move out... so worth it though!

 

A textured ombre mural can have a huge impact in a space
Photo: Daily Dream Decor

8. Textured Mural - Give sponge painting a modern edge by creating a textured ombré accent wall. See it here. [Photo: Daily Dream Decor]

 

Paint architectural details to make them stand out, like in this model living room
Photo:  Domino

9. Painted Architectural Details - This person could have painted the whole wall black, but instead chose to be a bit more creative. Check it out  here. [Photo:  Domino

 

Stripes and patterns make this wall pop
Photo: Dream A Little Bigger

10. Layered Stripe Accent Wall Ideas - This eye-catching wall is made simply with paint and tape... so all you'll have to do is paint over it once you move! Get the tutorial  here. [Photo: Dream A Little Bigger]

 

A painted stencil on a bedroom wall above the headboard
Photo: Kristen F. Davis Designs

11. Stenciled Wall - This beautiful wall looks like wallpaper, but it's actually made with two different finishes of the same paint color (high gloss and matte). Read more  here. [Photo: Kristen F. Davis Designs]

 

Confetti gives the appearance of energy and movement on this hallway wall
Photo: Rain On A Tin Roof

12. Confetti Wall - This bold accent wall is made by taping off confetti shaped pieces and then painting within those areas. Check out the directions here. [Photo: Rain On A Tin Roof]  

 

A simple black marker can totally transform a wall, using a modern geometric pattern
Photo: Vintage Revivals

13. Sharpie Wall - Yep, this fun look was done with Sharpie markers. Head on over  here to read more about the process. [Photo: Vintage Revivals]

 

Easily Fixable Ways to Create an Accent Wall

These walls will require a bit of repair before moving out, but nothing more than patching some holes.

 

Arrange plywood in cutout shapes to make an accent wall stand out
Photo: Reality Daydream

14. Plywood Geometric Wall - If you're into woodworking, this could be a fun one for you. Simply pry the wood off when you move and fill the nail holes with spackle. Get the tutorial here. [Photo: Reality Daydream]

  

This wall uses pinned ribbons to make it a focal point in the room
Photo: BHG

15. Ribbon Wall - This one can be done by stretching ribbon in diamond shapes and securing with thumbtacks. [Photo: BHG]

 

Herringbone accent wall in a nursery
Photo:  The Caldwell Project

16. Herringbone Accent Wall - Again, this one takes a bit more effort... but it looks so beautiful! Check out the how-to here. [Photo:  The Caldwell Project]

 

Here, the home owner used corrugated metal to promote a wall behind a sofa in a living to featured status
Photo: K & Co. Antiques

17. Corrugated Metal Accent Wall - This corrugated metal is normally used for roofs, but it looks great behind the sofa here. [Photo: K & Co. Antiques]

 

Glasscloth stripes elevate this surface
Photo: Via Homedit

18. Grasscloth Striped Accent wall - Cover beams in grasscloth and nail them to the wall... so pretty! [Photo: Via Homedit]

  

Frame wallpaper to make it look like large scale wall art on a feature wall
Photo: Inspired By This

19. Framed Wallpaper - Frame up large pieces of wallpaper (or fabric, wrapping paper, etc.) and hang them on the wall. [Photo: Inspired By This]

 

Faux brick is an interesting way to add an industrial feel to a room
Photo: Design Asylum

20. Faux Brick Wall - This one takes a bit more effort, but it it looks so great once it's finished! Check out the tutorial here. [Photo: Design Asylum]

 

20 Accent Wall Ideas for Apartment-Dwellers (Big Impact, Easy to Undo)
Share this image on Pinterest! [Photo: Apartment Therapy]

 

 

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Curbly Original
IKEA Hack: A Utilitarian Shelf Goes Rustic Glam

by Faith Towers
IKEA Hack: A Utilitarian Shelf Goes Rustic Glam
Photo: Faith Towers

The moment I ran across the Hyllis shelf on IKEA's website, I knew I had to hack it. My dining room was crying out for a shelf upgrade, so I drove down to IKEA immediately and bought three of them. You guys... they're only $15 apiece! My resulting hack has a glamorous vibe with a bit of rustic appeal, and it's super simple to do. Click through to check it out.   

 

IKEA Hack: A Utilitarian Shelf Goes Rustic Glam
Photo: Faith Towers

So much better, right?! I'm loving the contrast of the gold with the dark stained wood. Let's get started!

IKEA Hack: A Utilitarian Shelf Goes Rustic Glam
Photo: Faith Towers

Here's what you'll need for this project:

 

  • IKEA Hyllis
  • Gold spray paint (I recommend Montana Gold)
  • Dark wood stain
  • Four pieces of wood, size 10.5 x 23.5 and about 3/4 inch thick
  • Sandpaper
  • E6000 Glue
  • Rag or scrap of fabric
  • Rubber gloves
  • At least two C-Clamps (not pictured) 
IKEA Hack: A Utilitarian Shelf Goes Rustic Glam
Photo: Faith Towers

Begin by assembling the Hyllis shelf according to the directions and then spray paint it gold. You'll probably need two thin coats... let it dry thoroughly between coats. And yes, I spray paint in the snow. It's not ideal because the paint dries slower, but sometimes you have to make due!

Be sure to wipe down the shelf thoroughly with a clean rag to remove fingerprints before you paint, and don't forget to paint the undersides of the shelves and the insides of the support pieces.

IKEA Hack: A Utilitarian Shelf Goes Rustic Glam
Photo: Faith Towers

Next, apply the stain to the four pieces of wood. If you've never used stain before, don't be intimidated - it's surprisingly simple and forgiving! Just be sure to do it in a well-ventilated area and wear gloves and old clothes. Because it is aptly named... it stains. 

Let them dry overnight. You don't really have to do the undersides of the boards, but make sure you get the sides and go onto the edges of the undersides a bit (shown below).

IKEA Hack: A Utilitarian Shelf Goes Rustic Glam
Photo: Faith Towers

Now apply a generous portion of E6000 glue to the underside of the board, especially near the edges, and flip it over onto the Hyllis shelf.  

IKEA Hack: A Utilitarian Shelf Goes Rustic Glam
Photo: Faith Towers

Use C-clamps to ensure that the wood is firmly attached the the shelf. Most wood will be warped slightly, so this step is pretty important. Be sure to place a piece of scrap wood in between the clamp and the stained wood or else you'll end up with a round indentation where the clamp was.

Place one clamp on each side of the shelf, and let the glue dry for several hours. If you only have two clamps, move them to the next shelf and repeat the process. If you have eight clamps, you can do them all at once!

IKEA Hack: A Utilitarian Shelf Goes Rustic Glam
Photo: Faith Towers

And that's it... you're finished! Now go fill it with pretty knick-knacks. I love the look of it more and more everyday. The shelf we had there before was all wood, and it felt dark and dated. The metal frame of the Hyllis really adds airiness and makes the room feel much more open.

IKEA Hack: A Utilitarian Shelf Goes Rustic Glam
Photo: Faith Towers

And a quick safety note: be sure to bolt it to the wall, just like you would any tall shelf. There are small holes just below the top shelf that will allow you to do so. And before you call me out for not doing it, don't worry - it's on my to-do list for today!

IKEA Hack: A Utilitarian Shelf Goes Rustic Glam
Photo: Faith Towers

You could personalize this project by painting the wood a different color... white if you want to go super glam, or a bright color if you want to add some funkiness.

IKEA Hack: A Utilitarian Shelf Goes Rustic Glam
Photo: Faith Towers

This would look great in any room of the house - I can imagine it in the kitchen with piles of white dishware on the shelves, or in the kids' room with fabric bins for toy storage.

IKEA Hack: A Utilitarian Shelf Goes Rustic Glam
Photo: Faith Towers

Feel free to leave any questions you have in the comments section below. Happy crafting everyone!

IKEA Hack: A Utilitarian Shelf Goes Rustic Glam
Share this project on Pinterest! [Photo: Faith Towers]

 

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Curbly Original
5 DIYs To Help You Get Organized Using Things You Already Have

by Faith Provencher
5 DIYs To Help Get Organized Using Things You Already Have
Photo: Faith Towers

One of the (many) things that deters me from super getting organized is not wanting to spend a ton of money on storage containers and other organizational items. But then it dawned on me - why don't I use things that I already have make some storage containers? So today I'm sharing five of my favorite upcycled organizational DIYs that you can make from things you probably already have lying around the house.   

 

5 DIYs To Help Get Organized Using Things You Already Have
Photo: Faith Towers

1. Egg Carton Jewelry Storage - For this project, simply spray paint the outside of the plastic type of egg carton. I cut mine into two pieces and painted each one a different color. Easy peasy!

 

5 DIYs To Help Get Organized Using Things You Already Have
Photo: Faith Towers

2. Plastic Bag Dispenser - This one is made out of a disinfecting wipe container. Cut the label off, spray paint the top, wrap contact paper around the outside and then stuff your plastic bags inside. You'll never have a mess of bags again!

 

5 DIYs To Help Get Organized Using Things You Already Have
Photo: Faith Towers

3. Salsa Jar Canisters - For these apothecary style jars, I spray painted the tops of empty salsa jars and then glued knobs to the top using E6000 glue. These are great for holding bathroom items like I've done, or also things like beads or other crafting supplies.

 

5 DIYs To Help Get Organized Using Things You Already Have
Photo: Faith Towers

4. Contact Paper Storage Box - This catch-all storage box is simply a shoe box covered with marble contact paper. You could also cover it in wrapping paper, gluing it to the box with Mod Podge.

 

5 DIYs To Help Get Organized Using Things You Already Have
Photo: Faith Towers

5. Mason Jar String Organizer - For this one, remove the inside part of the mason jar cap and replace it with decorative card stock of the same size and shape. Punch a hold in the center before you screw it on, and thread the string through the hole. No more runaway string or yarn!

 

5 DIYs To Help Get Organized Using Things You Already Have
Share this post on Pinterest! [Photo: Faith Towers]

 

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20 DIY Bins, Boxes and Baskets To Help You Get Organized

by Faith Towers
20 DIY Bins, Boxes and Baskets To Help You Get Organized
Photo: The Casual Craftlete

Who else is in need of some help in the storage department? I know I am, so today we're sharing some attractive DIY storage projects... because it's way easier to get yourself organized when you have cute storage, right?!   

 

20 DIY Bins, Boxes and Baskets To Help You Get Organized
Photo: Erin Spain

1. Add some colorful personality to plain old baskets with this awesome tutorial. [Photo: Erin Spain]

 

20 DIY Bins, Boxes and Baskets To Help You Get Organized
Photo: Passion Shake

2. Hide unsightly items like remotes and magazines under the sofa with this clever rolling tray. Get the tutorial here. [Photo: Passion Shake]

 

20 DIY Bins, Boxes and Baskets To Help You Get Organized
Photo:
 We Can Make Anything

3. Add some extra style and functionality to a wire basket with this DIY fabric liner. Check out the instructions here. [Photo: We Can Make Anything]

 

20 DIY Bins, Boxes and Baskets To Help You Get Organized
Photo: All Crafts Channel

4. If you like to crochet, then this basket might be the perfect project for you. Watch the video tutorial here. [Photo: All Crafts Channel]

 

20 DIY Bins, Boxes and Baskets To Help You Get Organized
Photo: The Navage Patch

5. These herb-alicious boxes are made from scratch and then letter stencils are used to create the text. Get the how-to here. [Photo: The Navage Patch]

 

20 DIY Bins, Boxes and Baskets To Help You Get Organized
Photo: Revamperate

6. Here's a unique project that involves some dip dying and a glue gun. Learn more here. [Photo: Revamperate]

 

20 DIY Bins, Boxes and Baskets To Help You Get Organized
Photo: Erin Spain

7. Tin cans get a makeover in this easy little tutorial. Check it out here. [Photo: Erin Spain]

 

20 DIY Bins, Boxes and Baskets To Help You Get Organized
Photo: Lydi Out Loud

8. Rope is a great material for DIY storage! Find out how to make this ombré rope basket here. [Photo: Lydi Out Loud]

 

20 DIY Bins, Boxes and Baskets To Help You Get Organized
Photo: Kristi Murphy

9. Add some serious style to a boring tote, and use it as a storage basket... here's the tutorial. [Photo: Kristi Murphy]

 

20 DIY Bins, Boxes and Baskets To Help You Get Organized
Photo: The Casual Craftlete

10. Paint is the star in this super colorful little trinket box tutorial. Learn more  here. [Photo: The Casual Craftlete]

20 DIY Bins, Boxes and Baskets To Help You Get Organized
Photo: Little House of Four

11. Believe it or not, this began as one of those ugly plastic drawer sets! Find out all the details  here. [Photo: Little House of Four]

 

20 DIY Bins, Boxes and Baskets To Help You Get Organized
Photo:  Bang On Style

12. Upcycle some old jars into these adorable animal-topped storage containers! Here's the how-to. [Photo:  Bang On Style]

 

20 DIY Bins, Boxes and Baskets To Help You Get Organized
Photo: Faith Towers

13. This industrial chic storage container was made by yours truly. Check out the tutorial  here. [Photo: Faith Towers]

 

20 DIY Bins, Boxes and Baskets To Help You Get Organized
Photo:  A Piece of Rainbow

14. These fun storage boxes are made from old cardboard boxes and burlap. Find out how to make your own  here. [Photo:  A Piece of Rainbow]

 

20 DIY Bins, Boxes and Baskets To Help You Get Organized
Photo: Akamatra

15. Organize the yarn for your next knitting project using this genius idea. [Photo: Akamatra]

 

20 DIY Bins, Boxes and Baskets To Help You Get Organized
Photo: Better Homes and Gardens

16. Who knew PVC piping could be so handy? Find out how to make this laundry organizer here. [Photo: Better Homes and Gardens]

 

20 DIY Bins, Boxes and Baskets To Help You Get Organized
Photo: An Exercise In Frugality

17. Channel your inner Kate Spade with these fun storage boxes. Learn more  here. [Photo: An Exercise In Frugality]

 

20 DIY Bins, Boxes and Baskets To Help You Get Organized
Photo: Haberdashery Fun

18. This reversible fabric box would be useful for so many different purposes. Get the tutorial here. [Photo: Haberdashery Fun]

 

20 DIY Bins, Boxes and Baskets To Help You Get Organized
Photo: Homey Oh My

19. Learn how to cover boxes the right way with this easy tutorial. [Photo: Homey Oh My]

 

20 DIY Bins, Boxes and Baskets To Help You Get Organized
Photo: Pretty Neat Organizer

20. Turn wine crates into vertical storage using this clever tutorial. [Photo: Pretty Neat Organizer]

 

20 DIY Bins, Boxes and Baskets To Help You Get Organized
Share this post on Pinterest! [Photo: Erin Spain]

 

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Curbly Original
How to: Get Organized With This Colorful Wooden Crate Cart

by Faith Towers
How-To: Get Organized With This Colorful Wine Crate Cart
Photo: Faith Towers

I don't know about you, but storage is one thing that I can never get enough of. Especially cute storage. So today I'm sharing a project with you that I made to create some mobile storage for my home office. It's a stacking, rolling storage cart that can hold all of those odds and ends that you just don't know what to do with.   

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10 Creative Alternatives To Store-Bought Gift Wrap

by Faith Provencher
10 Creative Gift Wrap Alternatives
Photo: Rabbit Food For My Bunny Teeth

Still working on wrapping holiday gifts? Or maybe you aren't finished shopping yet? Today we have some gift wrapping ideas that are a little outside the box - literally and figuratively. We're sharing ten creative alternatives to basic, store-bought gift wrap... which will in turn save you some money, and be a little friendlier to the environment. Keep reading to check them out!   

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Curbly Original
How-To: Gold Thumb Tack Ornament

by Faith Towers
How-To: Gold Thumb Tack Ornament
Photo: Faith Towers

This holiday season, a group of the Curbly writers decided to team up and each of us created a simple and stylish new Christmas ornament. We're calling it the "Curbly Ornament Challenge" but there's not much competition involved...just a lot of fun, seasonal crafting. See all of the ornaments here.

 

During the busy holiday season there's always less time for complicated DIYs, so simple down-and-dirty projects are much more feasible. In that vein, today we're sharing a fun tutorial which will show you how to create a gold Christmas ornament using thumb tacks! Click through to check it out.   

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