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Using Linen Packaging for Yarn Storage

You know those heavy duty plastic bags that duvet covers, quilts, shams and etcetera come in these days? One way they can find a second life by keeping your yarn stash tidy.

If you currently keep your yarn stash in a big plastic storage container, you know that the individual balls or skeins find a way to become a tangled mess in no time.You reach in, dig around, balls unravel.

created on: 01/15/09

However, plastic bags that hold queen and king-sized bedding can store up to a dozen skeins/balls of yarn, which you can still tuck inside the plastic bin, if you want. Although, since these bags oftentimes have handles, you can hang them out of the way in a closet . The benefit of using a bag over a bin is that because the bag is see through (and smaller), you know just where to reach before you even open the bag, so no digging around trying to find that leftover pistachio 3 ply.

The smaller bags work perfectly for when you're actually using a ball or skein of yarn. If using a skein, a  pillow-sham-sized bag works great. Just punch a hole at one end and feed the yarn through it. While you knit or crochet, you'll draw the yarn through the hole. This keeps the yarn clean and--more importantly--out of reach of dogs, cats and children while you're working with it.

created on: 01/15/09
created on: 01/15/09

If your yarn has been balled, a snapped bag works best. Just slip the ball in and feed the yarn out a side opening at the top. Because the bag is slippery, the ball will roll around inside the bag, BUT it won't roll off the couch and across the floor either.

created on: 01/15/09

Of course, when that project is done, you can keep it safe in one of these linen packaging bags until it's ready to be gifted, like this baby blanket, which fit perfectly in a pillow sham bag.

created on: 01/15/09

If you have any alternative use ideas for linen packaging, let me know! I'd love to put together a special post highlighting their many uses.

 

 

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