Enticement & Architectural Pleasure

by Benmoore
 
 
House Thinking, by Winifred Gallagher, discusses the five notions of architectural pleasure. So far, we've covered peril, prospect, and refuge. Today, I'll share what I have learned about enticement.

Gallagher says, "everyone loves a surprise, and the quality of enticement gives a home some innately appealing frisson." (I had to look up frisson: a sudden strong feeling of excitement or fear, pronounced: free-SOHN.)

To create a feeling of...

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A womb with a view

by Benmoore

In my first post about the 5 characteristics of pleasing architecture that I gleaned from Gallaghers book, "House Thinking," I discussed the characteristic of peril and how it can add feelings of exhiliration to a house. Today, I'll write a little about refuge and prospect.


This is a picture of Frank Lloyd Wright's Taliesin West. Notice how low the ceilings are in this Frank Lloyd Wright-esque bedroom? Notice the big, bright view?

Wright...

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Is Your Home Dangerous Enough?

by Benmoore

I've been reading Winifred Gallagher's book, "House Thinking: A Room-by-Room Look at How We Live."

In it, she highlights the work of Grant Hildebrand and his quest to discover the characteristics of "innately appealing architecture."

He began his research by asking why homo sapiens might be drawn to some places and repelled by others. With colleagues in the fields of biology, psychology, geography, he came up with five characteristics of an...

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Our Living Room

by Alicia Lacy

The living room began with faded wood panelling, had a brief stint with cream, an even more brief stint with yellow, and finally settled upon "November Sky". The relationship survived its first year, which says a lot.

When we moved in, the windows were lined with fluorescent panels and heavy wool drapes. I bought simple, cheap cotton fabric buy the bundle from a local fabric shop and sewed like mad (I am a true novice with the machine of sewing)...

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How To Re-Shingle A Roof (and not die)

by Bruno Bornsztein

I had the 'opportunity' to re-roof my garage this summer, and I thought I'd try to save you from some of the trouble I went through. 

Laying down shingles isn't really very complicated, as long as you have the right tools and the slope of the roof isn't too insane. If you've got a small area to cover, it's a reasonable project to take on. But forewarned: it's hard work. For a smallish garage (about 450 square feet of roof) it took me two full...

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Are Americans Getting Hip To Design?

by Bruno Bornsztein

european_vs_american.png

Immigrants, expatriates, and airline-stewardesses have known it for a long time: there's a startling gap between American and European attitudes toward design. Entering the U.S. after spending any length of time in Europe (or, for that matter, practically anywhere else) is eye-opening. Everything looks bigger, more imposing, like the world has been outlined with a black marker. Even the buildings look like they could have all-wheel drive.

It's...

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My Other House is a Bike

by Bruno Bornsztein

If you're a bike-commuter, you spend a lot of time in the saddle. So why not give your home-away-from-home a bit of your own personal style? Well, creating a pimped-out ride like the own below isn't as hard as you'd think, especially with these detailed instructions from Instructables.com.

Doing a custom paint job on your bike is easier than you think

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But then, not everybody has such a nice sense of style:

Please don't do this to your bike.

Related: Taliah Lempert's paintings of bicycles should more than compensate for some of the ugly...

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Design Jobs Outsourced to Rats, Creatives Outraged

by Bruno Bornsztein

There are about sixteen other things I should be doing right now but I can't not post about this: from Front, a Stockholm-based design firm, comes Design By Animals, a series of design concepts created organically by animals. Check it out:

This little guy gnawed holes in a roll of white wallpaper, creating a pattern that reveals the older wallpaper beneath it. He's a natural!

 

 

This table was designed by taking the paths formed by...

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